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The Confederate Flag and Southern Sensibilities ....

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Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
SheWrites wrote:

You are picking choosing, Bob, and making invalid statements.  

Did Jesus dispute God when he said, "Love your neighbor as yourself?"

Did Jesus dispute God when he told the pharisees, "He who is without sin cast the first stone" as he showed compassion to an adulterous woman?

There's a big picture.  You continue to camp on those folks who see through their own narrow eyes of judgement.

But we've had this discussion before...

And who, pray tell, is Cousin Carl?  

As I said,  I've never gotten paid to have ideas like wordslinger and brother carl.  So for this reply,  let's listen to someone else who also gets paid to have ideas.  That way I'll be on a more level playing field with the professionals.

I want you to start listening to this discussion at about the 3:00 mark.
Starting at that point you will see two professional thinkers debate exactly what you and I are debating now...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoX3obeS8ew



Last edited by Bob on 7/10/2015, 3:50 pm; edited 1 time in total

Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
Sal wrote:You're the one who told us that you intentionally speak with an exaggerated southern accent like Earnest T. Bass and that you act like a good ol' boy in the redneck bars, Bob.

That's totally out of context.  What I actually said and what is the reality is that I am "more Gomer than Jim Nabors and more Jethro than Max Baer Jr."
My heritage is split between Mayberry (father) and Bugtussle (mother).  Separated only by the Smoky Mountains (Mayberry on the NC side and Bugtussle on the TN side).
My nickname since I was born is Smoky for christsakes.  

Nabors was born hundreds of miles away from there in central Alabama.
Baer was born in fucking Oakland.

I have a thick Mayberry/Bugtussle accent.  I was brought up with it.  
So whenever I was made aware of how southern my accent is,  I decided to do the logical thing and respond by making it even thicker.  
Kind of like when some asshole tells me to turn down the music.  The logical response to me is to turn it up.



Last edited by Bob on 7/10/2015, 1:50 pm; edited 1 time in total

Guest


Guest
Are you suggesting two southerners, one a follower of Jesus, one bisexual who has no religious background, have a talk show? I think we'd do better than these two and Cousin Carl...whoever he is.

Very Happy



Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
SheWrites wrote:Are you suggesting two southerners, one a follower of Jesus, one bisexual who has no religious background, have a talk show?  I think we'd do better than these two and Cousin Carl...whoever he is.

Very Happy



I really like the idea.  But it will require you get a different co-host.
That one time I had to get up and give a talk about antique slot machines in front of about a dozen antique dealers at the Western Sizzler,  I froze up so bad I couldn't even remember my name.

It was very reminiscent of this.  Except with a real accent.  lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBuPQgV8yBM

Guest


Guest
Bob wrote:
SheWrites wrote:Are you suggesting two southerners, one a follower of Jesus, one bisexual who has no religious background, have a talk show?  I think we'd do better than these two and Cousin Carl...whoever he is.

Very Happy



I really like the idea.  But it will require you get a different co-host.
That one time I had to get up and give a talk about antique slot machines in front of about a dozen antique dealers at the Western Sizzler,  I froze up so bad I couldn't even remember my name.

It was very reminiscent of this.  Except with a real accent.  lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBuPQgV8yBM


My favorite history prof in college used that clip at the beginning of each new semester. Love it.

Bob, someone in one of my short stories will HAVE to give a talk at the Western Sizzler. So Southern...

Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
You won't believe what a coincidence that is. One of my very oldest friends is now doing adjunct history teaching in a community college in Nashville. And he's using scenes from the Andy Griffith Show too.
What's so odd is he's always been more liberal than Karl Marx and I didn't even know he knew what the Andy Griffith Show was. But apparently some other teacher was using it and he liked the idea.

Guest


Guest
Bob wrote:You won't believe what a coincidence that is.  One of my very oldest friends is now doing adjunct history teaching in a community college in Nashville.  And he's using scenes from the Andy Griffith Show too.
What's so odd is he's always been more liberal than Karl Marx and I didn't even know he knew what the Andy Griffith Show was.  But apparently some other teacher was using it and he liked the idea.


Well, don't fall off your juke box, but they use Andy Griffith clips in church, too.

What a Face


Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
Don't know if you've ever seen what the actors out of character are actually like, SheWrites.
But if you haven't here they are.
Don't miss what Griffith says about the era the show was depicting.





Guest


Guest
Interesting.

Guest


Guest
Bob wrote:Brother Carl (not Cousin) is a lot of things,  SheWrites.  But he shares one distinction with wordslinger.  He's gotten paid to write stuff.  
Since I was never able to do that,  I always give at least some deference to anyone who has.


I've not been paid a dime.

Shuttin' my mouth.

Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
Well technically I have got paid for writing.  I put out one month's edition of an antique/collectible newsletter called "Transistor Network".  
The previous dude decided to quit and none of us wanted to see it die.  Mainly because it was the only buying/selling venue for antique transistor radios and if it died we wouldn't have anywhere to peddle the radios we were buying.
So me and a friend took it over.  I wrote about a half dozen articles for it and put different bylines on them.  
And we made a little money off it but not enough to keep us enthused after that one month.  lol

Guest


Guest
Bob wrote:Well technically I have got paid for writing.  I put out one month's edition of an antique/collectible newsletter called "Transistor Network".  
The previous dude decided to quit and none of us wanted to see it die.  Mainly because it was the only buying/selling venue for antique transistor radios and if it died we wouldn't have anywhere to peddle the radios we were buying.
So me and a friend took it over.  I wrote about a half dozen articles for it and put different bylines on them.  
And we made a little money off it but not enough to keep us enthused after that one month.  lol

The Confederate Flag and Southern Sensibilities .... - Page 3 Images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ-eUfTvflmsUIppubaIItleEd6Z8jmRYgDdqjTpJASiQkru0No

*****SMILE*****

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRcPA7Fzebw

Smile

Wordslinger

Wordslinger
SheWrites wrote:
Wordslinger wrote:For She Writes:  Yes, I'm stridently opposed to southerners who choose to ignore how their hateful Rebel flag offends so many of their fellow Americans, black, white, and green.  

I absolutely believe you when you claim you and your family are and were good people.  I accept that.  But if it's true, why then would you insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property, when it is so clearly offensive to so very many people?

Do your southern sensibilities outweigh those of African Americans?  I can't wait to hear you defend your position ...

Have I said, anywhere, that I "insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property."  No, I have not.

I have addressed the issue that the confederate flag should not be revered.  Should it be in a history museum?  Yes.  

Why would I want any of my life to outweigh anything of any African American's lives.  We all are created equal...we are neighbors, friends, and attend church together.  

The point is, Wordslinger, your aim is to backhand an entire region because there are inequalities.  Inequalities happen on a daily basis in all areas of the world.  At this time, because of the acts of one young man, we all are blamed.

You don't believe in God so I conclude you do not  believe in a single life judgement. I do and this young man will stand alone in his judgement.  His hate, his murderous escapade, whether on drugs or mentally ill or just plain mean, is his own.


It is most unlikely he'll be marching in any KKK parades from now on. You may be right about me backhanding the region ... as you point out, the great majority of the people of the south are not racists or hardcore fundamentalist my-way-or-the-highway Christian fanatics. But the fact remains, the great majority of people here have done little if anything to curtail, isolate, or punish the bad guys. Fiends like Dylann Roof actually believe they are supported by the majority. There is no doubt he sees himself as a hero. Yes, I do backhand the folks of the south for putting up with or purposefully ignoring the "good ole boys" who wave the Rebel flag. It evidently took 9 dead churchgoers to spur the majority into finally saying "that's enough." Reality

TEOTWAWKI

TEOTWAWKI
You make a lot of broad assumptions. If I said everyone from Hollywood was a child molester loving the defilement of youth and making a fortune selling sex on the screen I guess I would be about right. .

Guest


Guest
Just more leftist stereotyping bias to divide and conquer... nothing new to see here folks.

If they aren't exhibiting the bias themselves... they're assigning it to others. Standard leftist tactics.

Guest


Guest
Wordslinger wrote:
SheWrites wrote:
Wordslinger wrote:For She Writes:  Yes, I'm stridently opposed to southerners who choose to ignore how their hateful Rebel flag offends so many of their fellow Americans, black, white, and green.  

I absolutely believe you when you claim you and your family are and were good people.  I accept that.  But if it's true, why then would you insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property, when it is so clearly offensive to so very many people?

Do your southern sensibilities outweigh those of African Americans?  I can't wait to hear you defend your position ...

Have I said, anywhere, that I "insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property."  No, I have not.

I have addressed the issue that the confederate flag should not be revered.  Should it be in a history museum?  Yes.  

Why would I want any of my life to outweigh anything of any African American's lives.  We all are created equal...we are neighbors, friends, and attend church together.  

The point is, Wordslinger, your aim is to backhand an entire region because there are inequalities.  Inequalities happen on a daily basis in all areas of the world.  At this time, because of the acts of one young man, we all are blamed.

You don't believe in God so I conclude you do not  believe in a single life judgement. I do and this young man will stand alone in his judgement.  His hate, his murderous escapade, whether on drugs or mentally ill or just plain mean, is his own.


It is most unlikely he'll be marching in any KKK parades from now on.  You may be right about me backhanding the region ... as you point out, the great majority of the people of the south are not racists or hardcore fundamentalist my-way-or-the-highway Christian fanatics.  But the fact remains, the great majority of people here have done little if anything to curtail, isolate, or punish the bad guys.  Fiends like Dylann Roof actually believe they are supported by the majority.  There is no doubt he sees himself as a hero.  Yes, I do backhand the folks of the south for putting up with or purposefully ignoring the "good ole boys" who wave the Rebel flag.  It evidently took 9 dead churchgoers to spur the majority into finally saying "that's enough."  Reality


I had the opportunity this past week to meet a co-worker of my husband.  A beautiful and talented young woman from LA.  We discussed LA, my son lives there, and we have visited three times now.  Love the place.  

I asked how she was adapting to Florida.  She said she loves it.  Earlier in the week she had discussed with my husband how she went to Ponce de Leon for an Independence Day celebration.

As she arrived a few people were gathered with a huge Confederate flag.  She chose to leave.

I apologized to her.  Yes, I took on the role of an advocate for the whole region of the South, and apologized to her.  I explained that what she saw does not define who we are as a people, but, we do have blemishes and deep scars.  

She said she was over it and will not let it define this new place where she now calls home.  I told her I appreciated her view and would love to show her the great things of the South.  

Relationships matter.  Broad, swiping agendas never get to the root of an issue for true healing.  It happens person to person.

Markle

Markle
SheWrites wrote:
Wordslinger wrote:
SheWrites wrote:
Wordslinger wrote:For She Writes:  Yes, I'm stridently opposed to southerners who choose to ignore how their hateful Rebel flag offends so many of their fellow Americans, black, white, and green.  

I absolutely believe you when you claim you and your family are and were good people.  I accept that.  But if it's true, why then would you insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property, when it is so clearly offensive to so very many people?

Do your southern sensibilities outweigh those of African Americans?  I can't wait to hear you defend your position ...

Have I said, anywhere, that I "insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property."  No, I have not.

I have addressed the issue that the confederate flag should not be revered.  Should it be in a history museum?  Yes.  

Why would I want any of my life to outweigh anything of any African American's lives.  We all are created equal...we are neighbors, friends, and attend church together.  

The point is, Wordslinger, your aim is to backhand an entire region because there are inequalities.  Inequalities happen on a daily basis in all areas of the world.  At this time, because of the acts of one young man, we all are blamed.

You don't believe in God so I conclude you do not  believe in a single life judgement. I do and this young man will stand alone in his judgement.  His hate, his murderous escapade, whether on drugs or mentally ill or just plain mean, is his own.


It is most unlikely he'll be marching in any KKK parades from now on.  You may be right about me backhanding the region ... as you point out, the great majority of the people of the south are not racists or hardcore fundamentalist my-way-or-the-highway Christian fanatics.  But the fact remains, the great majority of people here have done little if anything to curtail, isolate, or punish the bad guys.  Fiends like Dylann Roof actually believe they are supported by the majority.  There is no doubt he sees himself as a hero.  Yes, I do backhand the folks of the south for putting up with or purposefully ignoring the "good ole boys" who wave the Rebel flag.  It evidently took 9 dead churchgoers to spur the majority into finally saying "that's enough."  Reality


I had the opportunity this past week to meet a co-worker of my husband.  A beautiful and talented young woman from LA.  We discussed LA, my son lives there, and we have visited three times now.  Love the place.  

I asked how she was adapting to Florida.  She said she loves it.  Earlier in the week she had discussed with my husband how she went to Ponce de Leon for an Independence Day celebration.

As she arrived a few people were gathered with a huge Confederate flag.  She chose to leave.

I apologized to her.  Yes, I took on the role of an advocate for the whole region of the South, and apologized to her.  I explained that what she saw does not define who we are as a people, but,  we do have blemishes and deep scars.  

She said she was over it and will not let it define this new place where she now calls home.  I told her I appreciated her view and would love to show her the great things of the South.  

Relationships matter.  Broad, swiping agendas never get to the root of an issue for true healing.  It happens person to person.

Your friend had no reason to leave other than she was bigoted. She is ignorant. YOU apologized for the people who see the Confederate battle flag as a symbol of hate. The majority of people do not and who do take pride in their Southern Heritage.

Guest


Guest
Markle wrote:
SheWrites wrote:
Wordslinger wrote:
SheWrites wrote:
Wordslinger wrote:For She Writes:  Yes, I'm stridently opposed to southerners who choose to ignore how their hateful Rebel flag offends so many of their fellow Americans, black, white, and green.  

I absolutely believe you when you claim you and your family are and were good people.  I accept that.  But if it's true, why then would you insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property, when it is so clearly offensive to so very many people?

Do your southern sensibilities outweigh those of African Americans?  I can't wait to hear you defend your position ...

Have I said, anywhere, that I "insist the Rebel flag remain flying on State or Federal property."  No, I have not.

I have addressed the issue that the confederate flag should not be revered.  Should it be in a history museum?  Yes.  

Why would I want any of my life to outweigh anything of any African American's lives.  We all are created equal...we are neighbors, friends, and attend church together.  

The point is, Wordslinger, your aim is to backhand an entire region because there are inequalities.  Inequalities happen on a daily basis in all areas of the world.  At this time, because of the acts of one young man, we all are blamed.

You don't believe in God so I conclude you do not  believe in a single life judgement. I do and this young man will stand alone in his judgement.  His hate, his murderous escapade, whether on drugs or mentally ill or just plain mean, is his own.


It is most unlikely he'll be marching in any KKK parades from now on.  You may be right about me backhanding the region ... as you point out, the great majority of the people of the south are not racists or hardcore fundamentalist my-way-or-the-highway Christian fanatics.  But the fact remains, the great majority of people here have done little if anything to curtail, isolate, or punish the bad guys.  Fiends like Dylann Roof actually believe they are supported by the majority.  There is no doubt he sees himself as a hero.  Yes, I do backhand the folks of the south for putting up with or purposefully ignoring the "good ole boys" who wave the Rebel flag.  It evidently took 9 dead churchgoers to spur the majority into finally saying "that's enough."  Reality


I had the opportunity this past week to meet a co-worker of my husband.  A beautiful and talented young woman from LA.  We discussed LA, my son lives there, and we have visited three times now.  Love the place.  

I asked how she was adapting to Florida.  She said she loves it.  Earlier in the week she had discussed with my husband how she went to Ponce de Leon for an Independence Day celebration.

As she arrived a few people were gathered with a huge Confederate flag.  She chose to leave.

I apologized to her.  Yes, I took on the role of an advocate for the whole region of the South, and apologized to her.  I explained that what she saw does not define who we are as a people, but,  we do have blemishes and deep scars.  

She said she was over it and will not let it define this new place where she now calls home.  I told her I appreciated her view and would love to show her the great things of the South.  

Relationships matter.  Broad, swiping agendas never get to the root of an issue for true healing.  It happens person to person.

Your friend had no reason to leave other than she was bigoted.  She is ignorant.  YOU apologized for the people who see the Confederate battle flag as a symbol of hate.  The majority of people do not and who do take pride in their Southern Heritage.


People and relationships are more important than a flag, Markle. You should know that from all that Jesus taught.

TEOTWAWKI

TEOTWAWKI
If the civil war didn't do anything else it highlighted the central governments extreme failure in diplomacy and their bias for northern economic interests . Lincoln was an abject failure and the dead on both sides silently attest to that that.  The confederate flag is a monument to those that resisted a corrupt and criminal federal government that gets worse each day.

Floridatexan

Floridatexan

http://www.greatamericanhistory.net/causes.htm


Causes of the Civil War: A Balanced Answer
by Gordon Leidner of Great American History

What caused the American Civil War? It is amazing that even today, nearly 150 years after the Civil War started, there is passionate debate regarding the "cause" of the Civil War. Consider this:
It is a fact that when the armies for the North and South were first formed, only a small minority of the soldiers on either side would have declared that the reason they joined the army was to fight either "for" or "against" slavery.
However, equally true is the statement: "Had there been no slavery, there would have been no war. Had there been no moral condemnation of slavery, there would have been no war." (This was made by Sydney E. Ahlstrome, in his monumental study of religion in America A Religious History of the American People, Yale University Press,1972, on p. 649; it was echoed by Maj. General John B. Gordon, CSA, in his Memoirs, Chapter 1, first page)

The message here is that the reasons a nation goes to war are usually various and complicated. The American Civil War is no exception.
Background
The curious thing is that although slavery was the moral issue of the nineteenth century that divided the political leaders of the land, the average American had very little interest in slaves or slavery. Most Southerners were small farmers that could not afford slaves. Most Northerners were small farmers or tradesmen that had never even seen a slave.
But political leaders on both sides were very interested in slaves and slavery. The South's economic system was based upon cotton--and slavery. The political leaders of the South, such as Robert Barnwell Rhett of South Carolina, William Lowndes Yancey of Alabama, The Fire Eaters and Robert Augustus Toombs of Georgia, recognized that if the South lost her slaves (i. e., had to pay slaves wages similar to what white laborers were paid), her entire socio-economic system would probably collapse. Hence any political action that took place that threatened the slavery system of the South received the undivided attention of the South's political leaders, many of whom were themselves slave owners.
Political leaders in the North were much more divided about the slavery issue. Many of the powerful abolitionists, such as William L. Garrison of Massachusetts, were either religious leaders or newspaper editors. A fewer number of abolitionsits, such as Senator Edwin Sumner of Massachusetts and Salmon P. Chase of Ohio, were politicians. The north had equally powerful political leaders such as democratic Senator Stephen A. Douglas who were either indifferent towards or supportive of slavery.
Today we recognize slavery as a moral issue. But in the early nineteenth century, it was seen as an economic issue first, moral issue second. A series of legislative actions, most notably the Missouri Compromise of 1820, had been enacted by Congress to put limits on the propagation of slavery, but compromise with northern and southern interests was always kept in mind. The South had an economic interest in the spread of slavery to the new territories so that new slave states could be created and the South's political influence would remain strong. The North had an interest in limiting the spread of slavery into the new territories for both purposes of controlling Southern political power AND support of the moral issue.
Up until the middle 1800s, slavery was kept as a background issue that remained largely the concern of political leaders of the South, and abolitionists of the North. But in 1854, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, sponsored by Democrat Stephen A. Douglas, brought slavery to the forefront of national attention. Kansas-Nebraska eliminated the old Missouri Compromise (which in 1820 had designated areas of the new territories in which slavery could and could not be introduced) and made it possible for slavery to be introduced in virtually any new territory. Douglas called the concept of allowing residents of the territories to decide the slavery issue for themselves Popular Sovereignty. Kansas-Nebraska caused a firestorm to errupt in the North, awakening many people to the danger of the potential spread of slavery. Moderate politicians such as Abraham Lincoln became active in the cause of fighting both the Kansas-Nebraska Act and the spread of slavery.
Conclusion

Although the majority of the American people-- including many moderate politicians like Abraham Lincoln--wanted to avoid Civil War and were content to allow slavery to die a slow, inevitable death, the most influential political leaders of the day were not. On the southern side, "fire-eaters" like Rhett and Yancey were willing to make war to guarantee the propagation of their "right" to own slaves. On the northern side, abolitionists like John Brown and Henry Ward Beecher of Connecticut were willing to make war in order to put an immediate end to the institution of slavery.

These leaders, through either words or action, were able to convince the majority that it was necessary to go to war, and in order to convince them they justified the war with arguments that only indirectly referred to the subject of slavery (i.e., state rights et. al.).

Southern politicians convinced their majority that the North was threatening their way of life and their culture. Northern politicians convinced their majority that the South, if allowed to secede, was really striking a serious blow at democratic government. In these arguments, both southern and northern politicians were speaking the truth--but not "the whole truth." They knew that to declare the war to be a fight over slavery would cause a lot of the potential soldiers of both sides to refuse to fight.

So-was the war about slavery? Of course. If there had been no disagreement over the issue of slavery, the South would probably not have discerned a threat to its culture and the southern politicians would have been much less likely to seek "their right to secede." But was it only about slavery? No. It was also about the constitutional argument over whether or not a state had a right to leave the Union, and--of primary concern to most southern soldiers--the continuation of antebellum southern culture. Although the majority of Southerners had little interest in slaves, slavery was a primary interest of Southern politicians--and consequently the underlying cause of the South's desire to seek independence and state rights.

This has been my attempt at providing a brief, balance answer to a complicated subject which has been the subject of many books. For further reading, I suggest Kenneth Stampp's Causes of the Civil War.

****************

Wordslinger

Wordslinger
What the shameful, hateful Confederate flag was is one thing. What it's become, thanks to the KKK and violent southern white racism, is another. She Writes acknowledges this fact. Semi Sane "I know NOSSING!" Markle doesn't. Maybe he can point out a few of the wonderful, honorable and notable aspects of the so-called Southern Heritage -- other than Mullet tossing, and Country Western music-- that should deserve our respect.

Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
Wordslinger wrote: Maybe he can point out a few of the wonderful, honorable and notable aspects of the so-called Southern Heritage -- other than Mullet tossing, and Country Western music-- that should deserve our respect.

Hardly just country, wordslinger. The South originated BY FAR more forms of American music than any other region. Jazz, blues, gospel, country and rock n roll were all invented by The South.

Wordslinger

Wordslinger
Bob wrote:
Wordslinger wrote: Maybe he can point out a few of the wonderful, honorable and notable aspects of the so-called Southern Heritage -- other than Mullet tossing, and Country Western music-- that should deserve our respect.

Hardly just country,  wordslinger.  The South originated BY FAR more forms of American music than any other region.   Jazz, blues, gospel, country and  rock n roll were all invented by The South.

In writing, art and music southerners have indeed excelled. But are these the elements people think of when they see the Confederate Flag?

Besides, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Tennessee Williams all wrote well after the Civil War. Jazz began in New Orleans in the early 1900s.

While such artists and musicians are very much a part of the southern heritage, I doubt they are represented properly by a Confederate flag. I welcome your input on the subject ...

Hospital Bob

Hospital Bob
Wordslinger wrote:
Bob wrote:
Wordslinger wrote: Maybe he can point out a few of the wonderful, honorable and notable aspects of the so-called Southern Heritage -- other than Mullet tossing, and Country Western music-- that should deserve our respect.

Hardly just country,  wordslinger.  The South originated BY FAR more forms of American music than any other region.   Jazz, blues, gospel, country and  rock n roll were all invented by The South.

In writing, art and music southerners have indeed excelled.  But are these the elements people think of when they see the Confederate Flag?

Besides, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, and Tennessee Williams all wrote well after the Civil War.  Jazz began in New Orleans in the early 1900s.


While such artists and musicians are very much a part of the southern heritage, I doubt they are represented properly by a Confederate flag.  I welcome your input on the subject ...

What you're missing is The Confederacy ceased to exist 150 years ago.
And yes for some that flag is still ONLY a symbol of racism and slavery.

But for many other southerners (like me) who were born 100 years or more after the Civil War ended,  that flag now represents something else.

I'm going to get in my car tomorrow and drive up about 40 miles north of
Atmore to the place where Harper Lee and Truman Capote were born,  where they lived,  and where they got their inspiration for writing.  
When I was working I traveled through Monroeville all the time.  But I was always obsessed with the work I was doing and never stopped to really take in the surroundings and try to get a feel for where that all came about.  When I'm up there tomorrow I'm going to experience that for the first time...

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/07/12/harper-lee-alabama-hometown-abuzz-over-go-set-watchman/

I don't think you'll be able to understand this,  wordslinger,  but that same Confederate flag represents everything I'll be taking in and learning about tomorrow.

Just like last year when I had the privelege of experiencing the live shows of both Lynard Skynard and the Charlie Daniels Band at the Fairgrounds.   There was a 100 foot wide Confederate flag behind them on the stage.  
That flag is also a symbol of the music I love so much.  Not slavery,  not racism. Quite the contrary. In that context, the flag represents southern born musicians who wanted the south to move forward and beyond the racism of it's past. Same as me.

2seaoat


Your friend had no reason to leave other than she was bigoted. She is ignorant. YOU apologized for the people who see the Confederate battle flag as a symbol of hate. The majority of people do not and who do take pride in their Southern Heritage.

As usual your opinion is polar opposite reality.  The fourth of July celebrates this great nation's independence from England and the English Oligarchy which was exploited the colonist.  We celebrate the nation.  We do not celebrate terrorists who were responsible for 500k Americans who died in the terrorist attacks against this nation.  If a person went to a fourth celebration and a group of people had a large ISIS flag you would not call her bigoted because she chose to leave.  You would not call her ignorant.  Most importantly you would argue that ISIS is the celebration of Muslim fundamentalism and was certainly appropriate at the fourth celebration.  You are wrong.  My family NEVER flew a confederate flag, and its roots are two hundred years living in the south.  The only people I have ever met(without exception) who fly the confederate flag are racist who are sending a clear message.  I applaud the lady for leaving.  Americans can give no ground to terrorist domestic or foreign.  The confederate flag in 2015 is flown for one purpose only.....hate, and if General Lee who fought under the battle flag of Northern Virginia insisted that it and any other symbol of the terrorist rebellion be put away, then there is only ONE reason it is displayed today.

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