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wow how affordable is the ACA? Not so much if you work and make average money

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Just for "fun", playing with various scenarios to calculate health care premiums under this "wonderful" ACA. I'd use the healthcare.gov site except that it is constantly not working.

The last one I plugged into that calculator was $75,000 annual income, both spouses age 65, and no kids.

The result ............ an annual premium of $20,736. That would be 27.6% of that hypothetical couple's gross income. Throw in income taxes (est effective tax rate of 10% $7,500) and FICA (about $5,750) if they are still working (which at that kind of premium they more than likely would have to plus possibly take out a mortgage to pay for it). That is a take home of approx $61,750 meaning that premium would be 33.6% of their take home pay.

That is affordable how?

I suppose they could decide not to work as much. Let's say they drop to $40,000. That drops it to $3,312 annual premium. They could nearly break even that way.

Even better drop it to part time for both (which with this current trend of making employees part timers is very doable) down to $20,000. They qualify for Medicaid and do not have to pay for any "affordable" health care insurance.

Why work?

Maybe that is this admin's plan all along to put the large number of young just college graduated to work. Drive the older worker off the payrolls?

http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/healthpolicy/calculator/

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I plugged in a 25 year old making $25,000 a year. monthly payment with subsidy is $145 a month.

I also used the Kaiser calculator and they came out the same.

Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.

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ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.

I am just telling you that's cheaper than today and in the past 5 years for a 25 year old in Florida for a decent plan.

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Is this you PD?

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cooyon+duhon+obamaville&oq=cooyon&gs_l=youtube.1.1.0l10.2360.3474.0.6509.6.5.0.1.1.0.79.330.5.5.0...0.0...1ac.1.11.youtube.NBAnPJF-32I

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Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket. But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.

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Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  


You don't know what your daughter would or would not have done prior to her surgery.

Obviously your daughter didn't have insurance since she had to pay out of pocket so she's one of the many that chose to take the risk of not getting hurt. That being said... Today she'd be one of the many who will simply pay the fine since it's cheaper.

*****SMILE*****

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQzUCO7rG0M

Smile



Last edited by Damaged Eagle on 10/6/2013, 3:39 pm; edited 1 time in total

Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
Did she pay any income tax?  Strange coming from you who what the young to pay more and more in taxes.

If she was young, and healthy she could have bought any of dozens of health insurance plans depending on the coverage she wanted.  How old was she and what was her income?

You don't even know what the deductible is on that $125.00 or what the co-pay is on that lowest priced coverage. All the deductibles I've seen so far, on those place are $5,000 to $6,000 and around $13,000 for families. They pay 67% which means even after the insurance kicks in, the policy holder is responsible for 33% of the charges.

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Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
So your daughter paid close to $50000 for a back surgery? Do you really expect us to believe that?

Markle wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
Did she pay any income tax?  Strange coming from you who what the young to pay more and more in taxes.

If she was young, and healthy she could have bought any of dozens of health insurance plans depending on the coverage she wanted.  How old was she and what was her income?

You don't even know what the deductible is on that $125.00 or what the co-pay is on that lowest priced coverage.  All the deductibles I've seen so far, on those place are $5,000 to $6,000 and around $13,000 for families.  They pay 67% which means even after the insurance kicks in, the policy holder is responsible for 33% of the charges.
Show me a family deductible for $13,000. You have been over 65 toooo long. $5000 up to $10000 deductible's have been around a while. Also parts of the letter you posted from Orlando newspaper from the realtor group was wrong.

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ppaca wrote:
Markle wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
Did she pay any income tax?  Strange coming from you who what the young to pay more and more in taxes.

If she was young, and healthy she could have bought any of dozens of health insurance plans depending on the coverage she wanted.  How old was she and what was her income?

You don't even know what the deductible is on that $125.00 or what the co-pay is on that lowest priced coverage.  All the deductibles I've seen so far, on those place are $5,000 to $6,000 and around $13,000 for families.  They pay 67% which means even after the insurance kicks in, the policy holder is responsible for 33% of the charges.
Show me a family deductible for $13,000. You have been over 65 toooo long. $5000 up to $10000 deductible's have been around a while. Also parts of the letter you posted from Orlando newspaper from the realtor group was wrong.
I think you should be task with showing hat the deductibles are.

we know they are at least $5,000.

and lets be honest here, a $5,000 deductible doesn't benefit anyone unless they are terribly sick.

having one of those is pretty much like not having ins at all

people need to be honest

Let's see if this works, quoted a female born 1970, 32503, nonsmoker just for ppo plans there are many more and these premiums are full premiums without any subsidy.
"Premier" in their name include both pediatric and adult vision and dental services.
Select Plan Name Annual Deductible Coinsurance Annual Out-of-Pocket Max Metal Level Monthly Premium Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential 1401 $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $375.76 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential 1406 $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $346.13 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential Plus 1401P $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $387.41 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential Plus 1406P $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $356.85 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) 1419 $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $287.76 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) 1430 $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $302.68 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) Plus 1419P $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $296.68 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) Plus 1430P $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $312.07 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost 1413 $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $398.35 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost 1423 $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $371.79 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost Plus 1413P $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $410.71 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost Plus 1423P $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $383.31 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1410 $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $319.69 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1416 $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $310.38 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1418 $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $410.43 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1420 $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $367.30 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1431 $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $352.13 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1410P $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $329.60 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1416P $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $320.00 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1418P $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $423.15 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Premier 1418V $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $445.16 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1420P $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $378.69 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Premier 1420V $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $398.38 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1431P $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $363.05 View Plan Details
BlueOptions All Copay 1424 $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $430.71 View Plan Details
BlueOptions All Copay Plus 1424P $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $444.06 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential 1434 $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $332.02 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential 1439 $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $305.83 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential Plus 1434P $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $342.31 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential Plus 1439P $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $315.32 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) 1452 $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $254.26 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) 1463 $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $267.44 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) Plus 1452P $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $262.14 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) Plus 1463P $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $275.74 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost 1446 $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $351.99 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost 1456 $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $328.50 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost Plus 1446P $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $362.89 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost Plus 1456P $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $338.69 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1443 $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $282.47 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1449 $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $274.25 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1451 $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $362.65 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1453 $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $324.55 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1464 $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $311.13 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1443P $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $291.22 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1449P $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $282.75 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1451P $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $373.89 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Premier 1451V $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $393.33 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1453P $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $334.60 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Premier 1453V $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $352.01 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1464P $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $320.77 View Plan Details
BlueSelect All Copay 1457 $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $380.56 View Plan Details
BlueSelect All Copay Plus 1457P $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $392.37 View Plan Details
Compare Plans

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Damn didn't come out in column form but right after the plan number, example 1401 that is the deductible for that plan. Some will say 0 because there is none.

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ppaca wrote:Let's see if this works, quoted a female born 1970, 32503, nonsmoker just for ppo plans there are many more and these premiums are full premiums without any subsidy.
"Premier" in their name include both pediatric and adult vision and dental services.
Select Plan Name Annual Deductible Coinsurance Annual Out-of-Pocket Max Metal Level Monthly Premium Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential 1401 $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $375.76 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential 1406 $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $346.13 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential Plus 1401P $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $387.41 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential Plus 1406P $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $356.85 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) 1419 $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $287.76 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) 1430 $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $302.68 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) Plus 1419P $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $296.68 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) Plus 1430P $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $312.07 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost 1413 $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $398.35 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost 1423 $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $371.79 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost Plus 1413P $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $410.71 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost Plus 1423P $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $383.31 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1410 $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $319.69 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1416 $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $310.38 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1418 $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $410.43 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1420 $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $367.30 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1431 $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $352.13 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1410P $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $329.60 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1416P $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $320.00 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1418P $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $423.15 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Premier 1418V $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $445.16 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1420P $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $378.69 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Premier 1420V $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $398.38 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1431P $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $363.05 View Plan Details
BlueOptions All Copay 1424 $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $430.71 View Plan Details
BlueOptions All Copay Plus 1424P $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $444.06 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential 1434 $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $332.02 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential 1439 $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $305.83 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential Plus 1434P $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $342.31 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential Plus 1439P $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $315.32 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) 1452 $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $254.26 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) 1463 $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $267.44 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) Plus 1452P $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $262.14 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) Plus 1463P $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $275.74 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost 1446 $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $351.99 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost 1456 $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $328.50 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost Plus 1446P $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $362.89 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost Plus 1456P $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $338.69 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1443 $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $282.47 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1449 $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $274.25 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1451 $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $362.65 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1453 $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $324.55 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1464 $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $311.13 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1443P $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $291.22 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1449P $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $282.75 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1451P $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $373.89 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Premier 1451V $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $393.33 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1453P $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $334.60 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Premier 1453V $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $352.01 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1464P $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $320.77 View Plan Details
BlueSelect All Copay 1457 $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $380.56 View Plan Details
BlueSelect All Copay Plus 1457P $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $392.37 View Plan Details
Compare Plans
Ok, plan number is first, next deductible, then co-insurance, next max out of pocket, tier level and then premium, wish it would have come out like I see it.

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ppaca wrote:
Markle wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
Did she pay any income tax?  Strange coming from you who what the young to pay more and more in taxes.

If she was young, and healthy she could have bought any of dozens of health insurance plans depending on the coverage she wanted.  How old was she and what was her income?

You don't even know what the deductible is on that $125.00 or what the co-pay is on that lowest priced coverage.  All the deductibles I've seen so far, on those place are $5,000 to $6,000 and around $13,000 for families.  They pay 67% which means even after the insurance kicks in, the policy holder is responsible for 33% of the charges.
Show me a family deductible for $13,000. You have been over 65 toooo long. $5000 up to $10000 deductible's have been around a while. Also parts of the letter you posted from Orlando newspaper from the realtor group was wrong.
Please, share with us all what was wrong.  It was not a letter from the Orlando newspaper.



Last edited by Markle on 10/6/2013, 6:48 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Chrissy here is male,female age 40 with 8 year old kid for 32503 zip code.

"Premier" in their name include both pediatric and adult vision and dental services.
Select Plan Name Annual Deductible Coinsurance Annual Out-of-Pocket Max Metal Level Monthly Premium Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential 1401 $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $927.35 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential 1406 $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $854.23 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential Plus 1401P $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $956.11 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential Plus 1406P $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $880.69 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) 1419 $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $710.17 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) 1430 $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $747.00 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) Plus 1419P $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $732.19 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Essential (HSA) Plus 1430P $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $770.17 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost 1413 $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $983.11 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost 1423 $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $917.56 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost Plus 1413P $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $1,013.61 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Predictable Cost Plus 1423P $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $945.99 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1410 $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $788.97 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1416 $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $766.00 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1418 $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $1,012.92 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1420 $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $906.47 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health 1431 $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $869.04 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1410P $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $813.43 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1416P $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $789.74 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1418P $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $1,044.31 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Premier 1418V $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $1,098.63 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1420P $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $934.59 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Premier 1420V $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $983.18 View Plan Details
BlueOptions Everyday Health Plus 1431P $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $895.99 View Plan Details
BlueOptions All Copay 1424 $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $1,062.97 View Plan Details
BlueOptions All Copay Plus 1424P $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $1,095.92 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential 1434 $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $819.40 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential 1439 $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $754.77 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential Plus 1434P $1,300 10% $2,600 Gold $844.80 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential Plus 1439P $2,100 10% $4,200 Silver $778.19 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) 1452 $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $627.50 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) 1463 $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $660.03 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) Plus 1452P $6,250 0% $6,250 Bronze $646.95 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Essential (HSA) Plus 1463P $3,500 30% $6,250 Bronze $680.51 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost 1446 $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $868.69 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost 1456 $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $810.72 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost Plus 1446P $3,000 0% $5,000 Gold $895.59 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Predictable Cost Plus 1456P $5,000 0% $6,250 Silver $835.87 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1443 $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $697.12 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1449 $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $676.83 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1451 $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $895.00 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1453 $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $800.97 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health 1464 $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $767.85 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1443P $5,750 10% $6,250 Silver $718.72 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1449P $6,000 0% $6,250 Bronze $697.81 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1451P $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $922.74 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Premier 1451V $850 10% $2,500 Platinum $970.72 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1453P $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $825.77 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Premier 1453V $2,500 20% $6,250 Gold $868.74 View Plan Details
BlueSelect Everyday Health Plus 1464P $5,000 10% $6,350 Silver $791.64 View Plan Details
BlueSelect All Copay 1457 $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $939.20 View Plan Details
BlueSelect All Copay Plus 1457P $0 0% $2,000 Platinum $968.35 View Plan Details
Compare Plans

Again just ppo plans, there are HMO's in each category also.

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Markle wrote:
ppaca wrote:
Markle wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
Did she pay any income tax?  Strange coming from you who what the young to pay more and more in taxes.

If she was young, and healthy she could have bought any of dozens of health insurance plans depending on the coverage she wanted.  How old was she and what was her income?

You don't even know what the deductible is on that $125.00 or what the co-pay is on that lowest priced coverage.  All the deductibles I've seen so far, on those place are $5,000 to $6,000 and around $13,000 for families.  They pay 67% which means even after the insurance kicks in, the policy holder is responsible for 33% of the charges.
Show me a family deductible for $13,000. You have been over 65 toooo long. $5000 up to $10000 deductible's have been around a while. Also parts of the letter you posted from Orlando newspaper from the realtor group was wrong.
Please, share with us all what was wrong.  It was not a letter from the Orlando newspaper.
Hey, I thought that article you posted was in this thread. Can't find it. Repost it here and I'll tell you.

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Those are the monthly prices?

Dreamsglore wrote:Those are the monthly prices?
The first set is for 43 yr old non smoking female in escambia county

The second set is for husband, spouse both 43 and child 8 in escambia county.

All are without any subsidy and the plans are PPO's. I told you and other weeks ago 30-40% higher without subsidy. Did everyone think I was bullshitting them?

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Had PM from someone in this thread, could not respond nor did I understand the title.

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If I were to retire in 2014 based on my income I would pay $64 a month for the silver plan. I am not eligible for retirement but I could drop down to parttime of 30 hrs and still keep my employer plan which would be about the same. Not bad.

[quote="ppaca"]
Markle wrote:
ppaca wrote:
Markle wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:
Chrissy wrote:
ppaca wrote:Chrissy's scenario is more realistic and probably dead on. That premium is not bad C considering that is lower than most decent plans today for the same 25 year old.

But Pace you an educator use 65 year olds? Think you better go back a re read the law, although the rates go up that far all the actuarial figures are based on age 0-64. If anyone is eligible for Medicare they cannot purchase any under 65 product it is illegal and that also means a 55 year old on disability on Medicare. The only people over 65 that can, is someone not eligible for Medicare and then hopefully they'd fall below 250 FPL to be eligible for subsidy. Most will be legal immigrants that have been here less than 5 years. Also you plugged in an annual salary above 400% FPL.
be forewarned, most 25 year olds are pretty healthy and are not going to be pleased on a low salary having to pay $125. a month for ins they don't expect to use.
I can assure you that my daughter would have appreciated that option when she had to have back surgery in 2011, being that she's an independent contractor...so she paid out-of-pocket.  But I agree that it's hard, because of the inequity in our tax system, for a young person to get ahead of their tax burden.  
Did she pay any income tax?  Strange coming from you who what the young to pay more and more in taxes.

If she was young, and healthy she could have bought any of dozens of health insurance plans depending on the coverage she wanted.  How old was she and what was her income?

You don't even know what the deductible is on that $125.00 or what the co-pay is on that lowest priced coverage.  All the deductibles I've seen so far, on those place are $5,000 to $6,000 and around $13,000 for families.  They pay 67% which means even after the insurance kicks in, the policy holder is responsible for 33% of the charges.
Show me a family deductible for $13,000. You have been over 65 toooo long. $5000 up to $10000 deductible's have been around a while. Also parts of the letter you posted from Orlando newspaper from the realtor group was wrong.
Please, share with us all what was wrong.  It was not a letter from the Orlando newspaper.
Hey, I thought that article you posted was in this thread. Can't find it. Repost it here and I'll tell you.[/quote]

Always glad to oblige.

You can always take up your argument with the AP too.

Oct. 2, 2013 11:00 AM ET

Cheapest Fla. health plan costs $86 a month

By MIKE SCHNEIDER AND KELLI KENNEDY

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The most expensive health insurance premiums for individuals in Florida in the new government-run online marketplace are in the Florida Keys, and the cheapest premiums are for a bare-bones plan offered in Broward County, according to federal data.

The state's cheapest monthly premiums were for plans covering only catastrophic emergencies in Broward County, according to figures released late Tuesday. Those plans offered by insurer Coventry One in Broward County would cost a 27-year-old almost $86 a month and a 50-year-old would pay $146 monthly. The state's most expensive premiums, for a plans offered by Florida Blue, have the highest level of benefits, known as a platinum plan. It would cost a 27-year-old individual almost $460 a month and a 50-year-old Floridian $782 a month.

Roughly half of Florida's 3.5 million uninsured residents may be eligible for federal subsidies to help them purchase insurance, according to the liberal advocacy group Families USA. But the amount will vary widely depending on income, location, the plan, family size, age, and even tobacco use. Florida residents can choose from 102 plans, the second-highest of any state.

The government-run marketplace is offering five different types of plans based on levels of benefits: platinum, gold, silver, bronze and catastrophic. Insurance plans offered through the exchange have undergone a major upgrade. As of Jan. 1, insurers can no longer turn away people with pre-existing medical conditions, and they will be limited in what they can charge to older policy holders. Consumers' financial exposure will be capped. Insurers are also required to offer beefed up benefits under the plans, so while prices may increase, consumers will be getting a meatier product.

Consumers were able to start shopping on the exchange Tuesday, although many in Florida and around the country were plagued by glitches on the website.

The problems continued Wednesday morning with users getting the same apology message for delays. Amid the problems, federal health officials refused to say how many people enrolled online. The number appeared to be low in Florida.

Several community health centers around the state, including ones in Miami and central Florida, were able to sign a small number of consumers up for health plans online.

"It was quick...we may have had a good 20 minutes or so before the system started to get funky," said Andy Behrman, president and CEO of Florida Association of Community Health Centers.

Workers planned for a possible web crash before launch day and printed hard copies of the online applications which they also translated into Creole for their Haitian clients.

"We don't care about the politics. This is about people so we were trying to make it easy for the patients," said Behrman.

It was a different story at a community health center half an hour away in the Fort Lauderdale area.

"We were not able to enroll but we were able to set appointment s for the rest of this week and help the people gather the required documentation to help their appointments a smoother process," said Jerson Dulis, a certified application counselor with Broward Community & Family Health Centers, Inc.

It's too soon to tell whether enough people will sign up for insurance through the new federal marketplace to make the law successful. If enough people participate, it will mean more customers for insurers and more paying patients for hospitals, giving them more incentive to experiment with different ways of paying doctors and delivering care in an industry with already shrinking profit margins. Experts anticipate many insurers will narrow the number of doctors in a certain network to curb costs because it's an easy way to control where patients go.

Overall, the most expensive premiums in Florida were for platinum and gold plans found in the Florida Keys, Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Lakeland. The least expensive premiums were for bronze and catastrophic plans scattered throughout metro Tampa, Jacksonville, metro Pensacola and South Florida.

The cost of premiums for a family paralleled the rates for individuals when it came to geography. The most expensive premium for a family in Florida was a Florida Blue plan in the Florida Keys. The platinum plan would set a family back $1,551 every month. The cheapest plan for a family was the catastrophic plan offered by Coventry One in Broward County. It would set a family back almost $290 each month.

Premiums for the same type of plans varied widely, and in some cases were twice as expensive, depending on the insurer and location. For instance, a platinum plan for a family offered by Humana in Palm Beach County cost only $733 — almost half as much as the premium for the Florida Blue family plan in Monroe County.

But insurers are cautioning consumers to consider more than just the bottom line. If you want to stay with a particular doctor's network or have around-the-clock customer service, it may cost more. Alternatively, even though a premium may be low, there could be a $5,000 deductible before the plan kicks in.

"Everyone is so focused on price that they're giving the consumer a false sense that it's only the price that's important to them," said Ray Smithberger, general manager in charge of Cigna Individual and Family Plans. Cigna is offering several plans through Florida's federally-run health exchange.

___

Kennedy reported from Fort Lauderdale, Fla

http://hosted2.ap.org/FLJAJ/c9d240e3e96e4b9a8bfb27e9b3a7063c/Article_2013-10-02-Health%20Overhaul-Florida/id-bb5b09e63e9742f684f317bbe88495b0

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ppaca wrote:Damn didn't come out in column form but right after the plan number, example 1401 that is the deductible for that plan. Some will say 0 because there is none.
Why not simply supply the link?

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