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millenials are allergic to hard physical work

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We cut a neighbors lawn across the street because they live 15 miles away and their lawnmower is broken. We have done it for two years and it is nothing but 15 minutes with the John Deere commercial mower.

Well, the house next to this vacant lot had this 30 year old cutting this small lawn with a push mower. It was the funniest thing I have seen in quite some time. I was watching the slowest lawn cutting in American history. The guy had a postage stamp duplex yard to cut and he was sitting down, cutting about a square yard, and then sitting down. I could not take it and cut his lawn, and he got more energy trying to thank me than he did all morning to cut his lawn.

My son, and son in law are a bit allergic to physical work. My son hires people like doing physical hard work is some kind of punishment, rather than a routine part of life which each of us must struggle to address. They shop for groceries online, and find physical work to be below them. I started working as a kid and the harder the work, the more I enjoyed it because I was growing and getting stronger from hard work. I am a very sick old man who could have cut that postage stamp lawn in twenty minutes with his push mower......this guy took all morning and I ended up cutting half his lawn. I just do not know how small business is going to get qualified hard working folks to do manual labor when our population is shrinking and legal immigration has been limited and further restricted. I guess playing video games in the basement has made a weak generation weaker.

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Never see gangs of kids riding bikes... to busy on the video games.

I feel good when I go the rec Center to take the girls..and kids are playing pick up games on all 4 courts.

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We rode our bikes all over town by the time we were in third grade, and we never had to have supervision to put a game together. I did not like our kids riding their bikes beyond a predesignated area, nor did I encourage spontaneous gatherings of kids just being kids without adult supervision, but I think we may have pampered a generation into advanced lazy.

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I think you are right... video games = instant baby sitter.

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Very interesting take on America's military readiness.

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2seaoat wrote:We cut a neighbors lawn across the street because they live 15 miles away and their lawnmower  is broken.  We have done it for two years and it is nothing but 15 minutes with the John Deere commercial mower.

Well, the house next to this vacant lot had this 30 year old cutting this small lawn with a push mower.  It was the funniest thing I have seen in quite some time.  I was watching the slowest lawn cutting in American history.  The guy had a postage stamp duplex yard to cut and he was sitting down, cutting about a square yard, and then sitting down.  I could not take it and cut his lawn, and he got more energy trying to thank me than he did all morning to cut his lawn.

My son, and son in law are a bit allergic to physical work.  My son hires people like doing physical hard work is some kind of punishment, rather than a routine part of life which each of us must struggle to address.   They shop for groceries online, and find physical work to be below them.  I started working as a kid and the harder the work, the more I enjoyed it because I was growing and getting stronger from hard work.  I am a very sick old man who could have cut that postage stamp lawn in twenty minutes with his push mower......this guy took all morning and I ended up cutting half his lawn.  I just do not know how small business is going to get qualified hard working folks to do manual labor when our population is shrinking and legal immigration has been limited and further restricted.  I guess playing video games in the basement has made a weak generation weaker.

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clown

ha ha ha.........the sweet irony is, if you live long enough, you too will have age privilege. Middle age whippersnapper........

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Joanimaroni wrote:I think you are right... video games = instant baby sitter.

They said the same thing about TeeVee in the 50's, 60's, and 70's.   But there weren't so many channels back then and the vast majority of the programming was, well, much more .... innocent?

I don't think video games or television are necessarily all that bad for kids so long as parents manage it responsibly for them.

Our kid was only allowed to watch PBS kid's teevee shows and only educational video games till the age of about first grade.  (we didn't even have cable or satellite for many years ... intentionally)  We limited her TV watching inasmuch as was reasonable beyond that age till about the time she got to Jr high age.

I do credit the "Reader Rabbit" video game series in particular with giving her a huge headstart on reading and math, although we also read to her daily (including the entire Dr Suess series) from the time she was very very  small.   She began being able to read a lot of things by herself sometime about the age of four and was a voracious reader by the time she hit first grade, but we know (now) that was also partially due to her being hyperlexic as a feature of her HFA.

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