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Trump's America: Open to Global Capital, Not People

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From Robert Reich's FB page:

Here's what Trump told global CEOs and financiers in Davos, Switzerland on Friday: “America is open for business.” We’re now a great place for you to make money. We’ve slashed taxes and regulations, so you can make a bundle here.

Here's what Trump says to ambitious young immigrants around the world, including those brought here as children: America is closed. We don’t want you. Forget that poem affixed to the Statue of Liberty about bringing us your poor yearning to breathe free. Don’t even try.

In Trump’s America, global capital is welcome, people aren’t.

Well, I have news for the so-called businessman. America was built by ambitious people from all over the world, not by global capital.

Global capital wants just one thing: A high return on its investment.

Global capital has no obligation to any country or community. If there’s another place around the world where taxes are lower and regulations laxer, global capital will move there at the speed of an electronic blip.

Global capital doesn’t care how it gets its high return. If it can get it by slashing wages, outsourcing to contract workers, polluting air and water, defrauding investors, or destroying communities, it will.

People are different. Once they’ve rooted somewhere, they generally stay put. They develop webs of connections and loyalties.

If they’re ambitious – and, let’s face it, the one characteristic that almost all immigrants to America have shared for more than two centuries is ambition – they develop skills, educate their kids, and contribute to their communities and their nation.

My great grandfather arrived in America from Ukraine. He was nineteen years old, and penniless. What brought him here was his ambition. He built a business. He started a family.

Then he invited his brothers and sisters from Ukraine to join him. He put them up in his home and gave them some of his savings to start their own lives as Americans.

You may call it “chain migration,” Mr. Trump, but we used to call it “family reunification.” We believed it wasn’t just humane to allow members from abroad to join their loved ones here, but also good for the America. It made the nation stronger and more prosperous.

By the way, global capital doesn’t create jobs. Jobs are created when customers want more goods and services. Nobody invests in a business unless they expect consumers to buy what that business will produce. Those consumers include immigrants.

Consumers are also workers. The more productive they are and the better they’re paid, the more goods and services they buy – creating a virtuous circle of higher wages and more jobs.

They become more productive and better paid when they have access to good schools and universities, good health care, and well-maintained transportation systems linking them together.

It was this combination – people rooted in families and communities, supplemented by ambitious young immigrants, all aided by good education and infrastructure – that made America the economic powerhouse it is today.

Along the way, regulations proved to be necessary guardrails. We protected the environment, prevented fraud, and tried to stop financial entities from gambling away everyone’s savings, because we came to see that capitalism without such guardrails is a mudslide.

We didn’t accomplish what we’ve achieved by cutting taxes and slashing regulations so global investors could make more money in America, while preventing ambitious immigrants from coming to our shores.

We raised taxes – especially on big corporations and wealthy individuals – in order to finance good schools, public universities, and infrastructure. We regulated business. And we welcomed immigrants and reunited families.

Global capital came our way not because we were a cheap place to do business but because we were fabulously productive and innovative place to do business.

Now Trump and his rich backers want to undo all this. No one should be surprised. When they look at the economy they only see money. They’ve made lots of it.

But the real economy is people. America should be open to ambitious people even if they’re dirt poor, like my great grandfather. It should also be open to their relations, whose family members here will give them a start.

It should invest in people, as it once did.

America didn't become great by global capital seeking higher returns but by people from all over world seeking a better life. And global capital won’t make it great again.

********

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Well, I'm no Trumpkin, but whats so wrong with limiting legal immigration for a time to immediate family members and persons of merit who will be an asset to our country and be able to support themselves and their family upon arrival?   And I'm not an advocate of the Great Wall of Trump, but what's so wrong about additional border infrastructure/security and interior immigration enforcement?

"Young Amercians have dreams too."  

Democrats are misguided in their thinking to oppose increased immigration enforcement, IMO ..... esp when the Republicans are offering up The Dream Act and offering to expand it to nearly 2 million people. Dems are not winning themselves any converts with their obstructionism. As someone once said "Elections have consequences" ... and as it's also been said, beggars can't be choosers. If an immigration bill doesn't come to fruition this year, Republicans will place the blame squarely on the Democrats .... and rightfully so. If the Dems had any sense about this, they'd grab this immigration bill by the horns, make it their own, and run with it.

Does our nation need more people?   (that's not a rhetorical question ... give your answer & let's discuss)



Last edited by EmeraldGhost on 1/31/2018, 12:16 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Floridatexan wrote:
From Robert Reich's FB page:

Here's what Trump told global CEOs and financiers in Davos, Switzerland on Friday: “America is open for business.” We’re now a great place for you to make money. We’ve slashed taxes and regulations, so you can make a bundle here.

Here's what Trump says to ambitious young immigrants around the world, including those brought here as children: America is closed. We don’t want you. Forget that poem affixed to the Statue of Liberty about bringing us your poor yearning to breathe free. Don’t even try.

In Trump’s America, global capital is welcome, people aren’t.

Well, I have news for the so-called businessman. America was built by ambitious people from all over the world, not by global capital.

Global capital wants just one thing: A high return on its investment.

Global capital has no obligation to any country or community. If there’s another place around the world where taxes are lower and regulations laxer, global capital will move there at the speed of an electronic blip.

Global capital doesn’t care how it gets its high return. If it can get it by slashing wages, outsourcing to contract workers, polluting air and water, defrauding investors, or destroying communities, it will.

People are different. Once they’ve rooted somewhere, they generally stay put. They develop webs of connections and loyalties.

If they’re ambitious – and, let’s face it, the one characteristic that almost all immigrants to America have shared for more than two centuries is ambition – they develop skills, educate their kids, and contribute to their communities and their nation.

My great grandfather arrived in America from Ukraine. He was nineteen years old, and penniless. What brought him here was his ambition. He built a business. He started a family.

Then he invited his brothers and sisters from Ukraine to join him. He put them up in his home and gave them some of his savings to start their own lives as Americans.

You may call it “chain migration,” Mr. Trump, but we used to call it “family reunification.” We believed it wasn’t just humane to allow members from abroad to join their loved ones here, but also good for the America. It made the nation stronger and more prosperous.

By the way, global capital doesn’t create jobs. Jobs are created when customers want more goods and services. Nobody invests in a business unless they expect consumers to buy what that business will produce. Those consumers include immigrants.

Consumers are also workers. The more productive they are and the better they’re paid, the more goods and services they buy – creating a virtuous circle of higher wages and more jobs.

They become more productive and better paid when they have access to good schools and universities, good health care, and well-maintained transportation systems linking them together.

It was this combination – people rooted in families and communities, supplemented by ambitious young immigrants, all aided by good education and infrastructure – that made America the economic powerhouse it is today.

Along the way, regulations proved to be necessary guardrails. We protected the environment, prevented fraud, and tried to stop financial entities from gambling away everyone’s savings, because we came to see that capitalism without such guardrails is a mudslide.

We didn’t accomplish what we’ve achieved by cutting taxes and slashing regulations so global investors could make more money in America, while preventing ambitious immigrants from coming to our shores.

We raised taxes – especially on big corporations and wealthy individuals – in order to finance good schools, public universities, and infrastructure. We regulated business. And we welcomed immigrants and reunited families.

Global capital came our way not because we were a cheap place to do business but because we were fabulously productive and innovative place to do business.

Now Trump and his rich backers want to undo all this. No one should be surprised. When they look at the economy they only see money. They’ve made lots of it.

But the real economy is people. America should be open to ambitious people even if they’re dirt poor, like my great grandfather. It should also be open to their relations, whose family members here will give them a start.

It should invest in people, as it once did.

America didn't become great by global capital seeking higher returns but by people from all over world seeking a better life. And global capital won’t make it great again.

********


Floridatexan wrote: Are you able to summarize the article or repeat what you consider salient points?

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It's facilitating human trafficking to obstruct border security... to the direct benefit of Mexican cartels.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-texas-truck-human-trafficking-20170723-story.html

http://www.insideedition.com/76-immigrants-including-children-found-stuffed-inside-tractor-trailer-40278

http://time.com/4871378/human-trafficking-signs-report/

Thousands of people fall victim to human trafficking across the globe each year, and the number of reported cases in the U.S. is on the rise, human rights groups say.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) considers human trafficking, in which people are forced into labor or sex, a form of modern-day slavery as well as a multinational, multibillion-dollar industry. A related problem is smuggling, which is the illegal importation of people into the country. Officials say it’s not uncommon for smuggling to lead to trafficking. Some of the victims pay to be transported illegally into the U.S. only to later be held against their will, according to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).



Last edited by PkrBum on 1/31/2018, 12:26 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Floridatexan wrote:  ....  America should be open to ambitious people even if they’re dirt poor, like my great grandfather. It should also be open to their relations, whose family members here will give them a start.


One man's opinion.

This ain't 1880. Times have changed. The world has changed.

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[quote="EmeraldGhost"]
Floridatexan wrote:

This ain't 1880.   Times have changed.  The world has changed.

You have a wonderful grasp of the obvious.

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America's going to learn a lesson that Mississippi is still resisting learning, and it's this -- when you display yourself as a bigot, people don't want to do business with you.

Mississippi's always whining that more big companies don't build factories here, but several have directly stated that they won't because of our dumb fucking flag, which nobody's willing to give up 'cuz it might mean Great-Great-Granddaddy Kusselfumpus was a racist. So, we cling to an antique rag and starve.

Trump is ruining America's brand overseas. Or at least putting it on hold, until we kick the scumbags out of government.

Lucky, it seems like a lot of them -- like Trey Gowdy -- are self-deporting. 2018 and 2020 will hopefully end the plague and we can rebuild.

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zsomething wrote:America's going to learn a lesson that Mississippi is still resisting learning, and it's this -- when you display yourself as a bigot, people don't want to do business with you.  

Mississippi's always whining that more big companies don't build factories here, but several have directly stated that they won't because of our dumb fucking flag, which nobody's willing to give up 'cuz it might mean Great-Great-Granddaddy Kusselfumpus was a racist.  So, we cling to an antique rag and starve.

Trump is ruining America's brand overseas.  Or at least putting it on hold, until we kick the scumbags out of government.

Lucky, it seems like a lot of them -- like Trey Gowdy -- are self-deporting.  2018 and 2020 will hopefully end the plague and we can rebuild.




Not just Mississippi, Kentucky too. The funny part is when Maddow calls him Dr. Paul because they say his wife set up a fake board years ago and she certified him as a doctor. No surprise that he once called misinformation a good thing. Why would any company want to do business with a state that keeps electing a racist weasel like him?


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zsomething wrote:America's going to learn a lesson that Mississippi is still resisting learning, and it's this -- when you display yourself as a bigot, people don't want to do business with you.  ....


Although I know a lot of starry eyed leftists with their virtue-signaling  heads all up in the diversity clouds like to embrace milk-soppy fantasies like that as fact,  I don't buy it.

When it come to international business it's mostly money-talks & bullshit walks.   As long as they know there's going to be a relatively fair playing field, a fair legal environment, and they're gonna make money, that's all that really counts.

Look at Saudi Arabia .... plenty of other countries doing business with them.  They'll chop your head off over there.   Another example:  Japan.   Shall I continue?  

So ... what multinational corporation of any consequence do you think is going to boycott the United States because we are all supposedly soooooo much more "bigoted" than the rest of the world?

(oh, and btw .... what companies are boycotting Mississippi?)

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EmeraldGhost wrote:
zsomething wrote:America's going to learn a lesson that Mississippi is still resisting learning, and it's this -- when you display yourself as a bigot, people don't want to do business with you.  ....


Although I know a lot of starry eyed leftists with their virtue-signaling  heads all up in the diversity clouds like to embrace milk-soppy fantasies like that as fact,  I don't buy it.

When it come to international business it's mostly money-talks & bullshit walks.   As long as they know there's going to be a relatively fair playing field, a fair legal environment, and they're gonna make money, that's all that really counts.

Look at Saudi Arabia .... plenty of other countries doing business with them.  They'll chop your head off over there.   Another example:  Japan.   Shall I continue?  

So ... what multinational corporation of any consequence do you think is going to boycott the United States because we are all supposedly soooooo much more "bigoted" than the rest of the world?

(oh, and btw .... what companies are boycotting Mississippi?)

Don't have a list on hand, but it's a thing that's been ongoing for years. I know there was wrangling with a Toyota plant for a long time over it before they finally decided to open here.

And it's been a long-time issue for local businesses. . And here's more on the lousy image it gives the state.

As far as how Trump's bigotry is costing America some business, I don't know about corporations, yet, but tourism is down, and universities are hurting because they take in a lot of international students who are now scared to come here because of the signals Trump is sending. I know enrollment in the local universities have taken a hit because of that.

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zsomething wrote:
EmeraldGhost wrote:  .....
(oh, and btw .... what companies are boycotting Mississippi?)[/i]

Don't have a list on hand, but it's a thing that's been ongoing for years.  I know there was wrangling with a Toyota plant for a long time over it before they finally decided to open here.


Lots of "wrangling" been going on for a couple of decades now with States/cities in the southeast trying to get an auto plant.  That's nothing unusual.   And look how many auto plants have gone into the southeast in the past couple of decades.  And nobody wants to do business in a southern US State because they are supposedly sooooooo "bigoted"?  

Ever hear of the Southern Auto Corridor?  http://southernautocorridor.com/



Southern Auto Corridor News
January 2018



Alabama captures Toyota-Mazda

Kentucky sets record for investments in 2017

Bridgestone unveils its new 30-story headquarters tower in Nashville

U.S. manufacturers are fired up

Manufacturing unemployment at record low

Manufacturing hiring tops 1 million since 2010

Looks like Volkswagen’s electric vehicle future is in Chattanooga

Nissan launches new LEAF in Tennessee

Big deal set for Kentucky

Cardone Industries to build South Texas distribution center

Toyota Boshoku expands in Jackson, Tenn.

Automotive supplier opens new Georgia facility

Parker Hannifin adding workers in Mississippi

Aerospace-auto parts manufacturer to locate plant in South Carolina

Chinese tire plant goes to North Carolina

Belgian manufacturer to build first U.S. plant in North Carolina

Automotive supplier locates in Tennessee

South Carolina company to relocate HQ to Fort Lauderdale

Aftermarket auto supplier adding jobs in South Carolina

Auto supplier expands in North Carolina

Tier 1 Hyundai supplier expanding in Alabama

Auto wheel manufacturer investing in Kentucky

South Korean parts supplier picks Kentucky for first U.S. plant

Alabama parts supplier adding jobs

Bosch growing Upstate South Carolina plant

So far as I'm concerned, people in the South are no less and no more bigoted than people who live in other parts of the USA ... and the world, really. While that idea may have once had some validity, nowadays it's mostly just a stereotype.  In fact, I would even go so far to say is there's a lot of subtle personal bigotry against white people from the South in this country.

(btw ... they've been building Nissans in Canton, MS since 2003 and Toyotas in Blue Springs, MS since 2012)

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EmeraldGhost wrote:
Although I know a lot of starry eyed leftists with their virtue-signaling  heads all up in the diversity clouds like to embrace milk-soppy fantasies like that as fact,  I don't buy it.

When it come to international business it's mostly money-talks & bullshit walks.   As long as they know there's going to be a relatively fair playing field, a fair legal environment, and they're gonna make money, that's all that really counts.

Look at Saudi Arabia .... plenty of other countries doing business with them.  They'll chop your head off over there.   Another example:  Japan.   Shall I continue?  

So ... what multinational corporation of any consequence do you think is going to boycott the United States because we are all supposedly soooooo much more "bigoted" than the rest of the world?

Oh, this is so sad. When you first started posting here I thought "Great, this guy seems intelligent, able to express himself and is willing to look at complex issues from every side", then you go and post this simplistic reactionary drivel! As someone who shall remain nameless mentioned in another post, it ain't 1880 anymore.

It's been milk-soppy, starry-eyed leftists that have been behind every piece of social legislation since FDR. Would this be a better or fairer country without Social Security or the Civil Rights Act?

Maybe we should repeal the 13th Amendment because it's just too diversity-embracing?

As far as multinational corporations go, they'd chew you up and shit you out if it wasn't for starry-eyed leftists trying to rein them in.

As for boycotts:

Boycotting a state to protest its stance on a social issue is not a new tactic. In the 1990s, boycotts were launched against Arizona for the lack of a state holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and against Colorado after voters approved an initiative (later struck down) that would have allowed landlords and employers to exclude gays.

In the most prominent recent example until North Carolina and Mississippi, 12 conventions told Indiana that one reason they chose not to book in Indianapolis was the state's 2015 Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which permits businesses to refuse service to a person if such service violates their religious beliefs.

Indiana's tourism bureau pegged the cost of the canceled conventions at $60 million to the state.


http://www.governing.com/topics/politics/tns-boycott-lgbt-economy.html

And read up on BDS while you're at it. If there's one thing companies fear it's bad publicity that effects their bottom line. And, once again, it's why I have such a low opinion of polite, permitted demonstrations. If you want to have an impact, just start disrupting commerce.

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Deus X wrote:
EmeraldGhost wrote:
Although I know a lot of starry eyed leftists with their virtue-signaling  heads all up in the diversity clouds like to embrace milk-soppy fantasies like that as fact,  I don't buy it.

When it come to international business it's mostly money-talks & bullshit walks.   As long as they know there's going to be a relatively fair playing field, a fair legal environment, and they're gonna make money, that's all that really counts.

Look at Saudi Arabia .... plenty of other countries doing business with them.  They'll chop your head off over there.   Another example:  Japan.   Shall I continue?  

So ... what multinational corporation of any consequence do you think is going to boycott the United States because we are all supposedly soooooo much more "bigoted" than the rest of the world?

Oh, this is so sad. When you first started posting here I thought "Great, this guy seems intelligent, able to express himself and is willing to look at complex issues from every side", then you go and post this simplistic reactionary drivel! As someone who shall remain nameless mentioned in another post, it ain't 1880 anymore.

It's been milk-soppy, starry-eyed leftists that have been behind every piece of social legislation since FDR. Would this be a better or fairer country without Social Security or the Civil Rights Act?

Maybe we should repeal the 13th Amendment because it's just too diversity-embracing?

As far as multinational corporations go, they'd chew you up and shit you out if it wasn't for starry-eyed leftists trying to rein them in.

As for boycotts:

Boycotting a state to protest its stance on a social issue is not a new tactic. In the 1990s, boycotts were launched against Arizona for the lack of a state holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and against Colorado after voters approved an initiative (later struck down) that would have allowed landlords and employers to exclude gays.

In the most prominent recent example until North Carolina and Mississippi, 12 conventions told Indiana that one reason they chose not to book in Indianapolis was the state's 2015 Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which permits businesses to refuse service to a person if such service violates their religious beliefs.

Indiana's tourism bureau pegged the cost of the canceled conventions at $60 million to the state.


http://www.governing.com/topics/politics/tns-boycott-lgbt-economy.html

And read up on BDS while you're at it. If there's one thing companies fear it's bad publicity that effects their bottom line. And, once again, it's why I have such a low opinion of polite, permitted demonstrations. If you want to have an impact, just start disrupting commerce.

I get so weary sometimes of people with intellectual blind spots.

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EmeraldGhost wrote:
Lots of "wrangling" been going on for a couple of decades now with States/cities in the southeast trying to get an auto plant.  That's nothing unusual.   And look how many auto plants have gone into the southeast in the past couple of decades.  And nobody wants to do business in a southern US State because they are supposedly sooooooo "bigoted"?  

Manufacturing companies like the southeastern states because they are mostly anti-Union and right-to-work, consequently wages are lower. This is incontrovertibly one of the causes of the catastrophic shrinkage of the middle-class in this country.

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EmeraldGhost wrote:
I get so weary sometimes of people with intellectual blind spots.

Which is just another way of saying: "That's all very nice, Mr. Galileo but it's still the Sun going around the Earth."

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Deus X wrote:
EmeraldGhost wrote:
Lots of "wrangling" been going on for a couple of decades now with States/cities in the southeast trying to get an auto plant.  That's nothing unusual.   And look how many auto plants have gone into the southeast in the past couple of decades.  And nobody wants to do business in a southern US State because they are supposedly sooooooo "bigoted"?  

Manufacturing companies like the southeastern states because they are mostly anti-Union and right-to-work, consequently wages are lower. This is incontrovertibly one of the causes of the catastrophic shrinkage of the middle-class in this country.


I don't think unions are strong anywhere in this country anymore ... which is what your graph really shows. They've got no juice. When's the last real strike you heard of in this country. Has nothing to do with the Southeastern US in particular.

(I'm not anti-union, btw. I was actually a charter member of a public-sector Union local once and served in various capacities including Steward, Chief Steward, Vice-President, and President. I was also a city councilman for four years in a small town, and I slept at a Holiday Inn once ... but I s'pose that's not really relevant Laughing )


I think building in areas with lower other overhead costs, transportation/supply-chain factors, and in an area with a a population that has a culture of a good work ethic were far more important to the auto companies than the rate of pay for the rank-and-file assembly workers. Southeastern states are generally lower cost of living anyway so the prevailing rate of pay does not need to be as high as, say California, for workers to have the same, or even a better, quality of life.

So ... you have some comparison of pay/benefits at union vs non-union auto plants. It would be an interesting comparison to make.

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Deus X wrote:
EmeraldGhost wrote:
I get so weary sometimes of people with intellectual blind spots.

Which is just another way of saying: "That's all very nice, Mr. Galileo but it's still the Sun going around the Earth."

No ... it's just another way of saying "you're predictable" Laughing

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A company will locate where they can make the most money. Central locations cut transportation costs. KY and TN are booming in the manufacturing sector as the costs for utilities, labor, and transportation are most advantageous. I would rather our manufacturing fill the south so they can begin paying their bills and get off the public dole. The former booming manufacturing states have been carrying the south for a hundred years. It is time for them to pull their weight.

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EmeraldGhost wrote:

I don't think unions are strong anywhere in this country anymore ... which is what your graph really shows.  They've got no juice.   When's the last real strike you heard of in this country.   Has nothing to do with the Southeastern US in particular.  

I think building in areas with lower other overhead costs, transportation/supply-chain factors, and in an area with a a population that has a culture of a good work ethic were far more important to the auto companies than the rate of pay for the rank-and-file assembly workers.  Southeastern states are generally lower cost of living anyway so the prevailing rate of pay does not need to be as high as, say California, for workers to have the same, or even a better, quality of life.

So ... you have some comparison of pay/benefits at union vs non-union auto plants.    It would be an interesting comparison to make.

Unions aren't strong anymore because they have been mortally wounded by a prolonged and deliberate attack on Labor by business--starting with Taft-Hartley in '47.

But yes, pay vs. cost-of-living was a factor. That, however, raises the question of why the cost of living is so much cheaper in the South. Is it because of their history of exploiting labor by refusing to pass any social-benefit legislation? Which is the chicken and which the egg?

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