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Hurricane Florence, wind, rain, flooding, toxic sludge

+5
2seaoat
Floridatexan
EmeraldGhost
Telstar
othershoe1030
9 posters

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othershoe1030

othershoe1030

As if the hurricane force winds weren't enough now it may be payback time for misusing Mother Earth.

Hurricane Florence’s potential for destruction also includes increased risks for the environment and public health as torrential rains could overwhelm the pits where toxic waste from power plants is stored. Animal-manure lagoons are also at risk of flooding.

Duke Energy Corp. was ordered two years ago to clean up coal-ash ponds in North Carolina that posed risks to the environment and public health. The company won’t be done in time for the storm, leaving the sites vulnerable to spills that can unleash the waste. The state is also a major producer of poultry and hogs, and man-made lagoons that hold manure also could be at risk of overflowing into fields and nearby waterways.

https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/southeast/2018/09/11/500732.htm

Telstar

Telstar


I miss sludge. Laughing

othershoe1030

othershoe1030

After the multi-day coverage of Florence I hope everyone who needs to get out does.
Also, if somehow the storm peters out and becomes nothing more than a glorified rain event it will be harder in the future for the public to believe all the hype. That's too bad because one of these days the hype will be very real and it will be a disaster.

EmeraldGhost

EmeraldGhost

othershoe1030 wrote:After the multi-day coverage of Florence I hope everyone who needs to get out does.
Also, if somehow the storm peters out and becomes nothing more than a glorified rain event it will be harder in the future for the public to believe all the hype. That's too bad because one of these days the hype will be very real and it will be a disaster.

A slow moving "rain event" can be worse than a fast moving storm with higher winds when it comes ashore.  Just ask the folks in Houston.

Floridatexan

Floridatexan

EmeraldGhost wrote:
othershoe1030 wrote:After the multi-day coverage of Florence I hope everyone who needs to get out does.
Also, if somehow the storm peters out and becomes nothing more than a glorified rain event it will be harder in the future for the public to believe all the hype. That's too bad because one of these days the hype will be very real and it will be a disaster.

A slow moving "rain event" can be worse than a fast moving storm with higher winds when it comes ashore.  Just ask the folks in Houston.

I lived in Houston for many years. The soil is a mixture of sand and clay. I worked for an office complex on I-10 (Gessner). One morning after a heavy rain, one of the buildings split right down the middle of the hallway. The terrain is flat, so the water has nowhere to go when the bayous fill up. And Houston has some of the crummiest zoning in the country.

othershoe1030

othershoe1030

Floridatexan wrote:
EmeraldGhost wrote:
othershoe1030 wrote:After the multi-day coverage of Florence I hope everyone who needs to get out does.
Also, if somehow the storm peters out and becomes nothing more than a glorified rain event it will be harder in the future for the public to believe all the hype. That's too bad because one of these days the hype will be very real and it will be a disaster.

A slow moving "rain event" can be worse than a fast moving storm with higher winds when it comes ashore.  Just ask the folks in Houston.

I lived in Houston for many years.  The soil is a mixture of sand and clay.  I worked for an office complex on I-10 (Gessner).  One morning after a heavy rain, one of the buildings split right down the middle of the hallway.  The terrain is flat, so the water has nowhere to go when the bayous fill up.  And Houston has some of the crummiest zoning in the country.

That was covered by flood insurance?

2seaoat



othershoe1030 wrote:After the multi-day coverage of Florence I hope everyone who needs to get out does.
Also, if somehow the storm peters out and becomes nothing more than a glorified rain event it will be harder in the future for the public to believe all the hype. That's too bad because one of these days the hype will be very real and it will be a disaster.

This was the essence of my debate with Bob about Hurricane forecasting. They kill people sometimes immediately by not forecasting where it actually hit, and by crying wolf so often people ignore the warning like they did in Katrina after getting multiple false warnings prior.

Deus X

Deus X

People too poor to evacuate Hurricane Florence should ask neighbors for help, FEMA says

Some poor communities are particularly vulnerable to flooding, like North Carolina’s Tyrell and Hyde counties, which “are among the poorest counties in the state (98th and 100th out of 100) with elevations so low that high tides turn land into water,” according to Oxfam.

FEMA has suggested that people turn to their neighbors, or even strangers, for help. Asked specifically about people who feel they are too poor to evacuate, Byard said they should reach out to those “who they would work with daily” for social services. “A lot of our communities will provide resources to move those individuals out,” he said.

Evacuations will be handled by state governments, Byard said, although FEMA sometimes provides support transportation. Many shelters will be run by the Red Cross in state or federal buildings, though these rely on FEMA for supplies like drinking water and non-perishable meals, said Charley English, the National Emergency Liasion for the Red Cross.

Poor people should also turn to individuals they know, Byard said, and people should help each other. “It’s neighbor-helping-neighbor in this situation,” he said.


https://qz.com/1388031/hurricane-florence-femas-evacuation-advice-for-poor-people/




In other words: If you're too poor to evacuate, tough shit!

"Poverty is like punishment for a crime you didn't commit."   Eli Khamarov

PkrBum

PkrBum

There's no other country in the world with as many opportunities to improve your condition as the USA.

Deus X

Deus X

PkrBum wrote:There's no other country in the world with as many opportunities to improve your condition as the USA.



Oh, boy--this is gonna be fun to watch!

Floridatexan

Floridatexan

othershoe1030 wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:
EmeraldGhost wrote:
othershoe1030 wrote:After the multi-day coverage of Florence I hope everyone who needs to get out does.
Also, if somehow the storm peters out and becomes nothing more than a glorified rain event it will be harder in the future for the public to believe all the hype. That's too bad because one of these days the hype will be very real and it will be a disaster.

A slow moving "rain event" can be worse than a fast moving storm with higher winds when it comes ashore.  Just ask the folks in Houston.

I lived in Houston for many years.  The soil is a mixture of sand and clay.  I worked for an office complex on I-10 (Gessner).  One morning after a heavy rain, one of the buildings split right down the middle of the hallway.  The terrain is flat, so the water has nowhere to go when the bayous fill up.  And Houston has some of the crummiest zoning in the country.

That was covered by flood insurance?

I don't know. There was no water on the inside of the building, but the floor cracked down the middle. There were 10 buildings in the complex, and this one was on the far west of the property...not in a flood zone and elevated, with the freeway running in front.

polecat

polecat

Hurricane Florence, wind, rain, flooding, toxic sludge Dm6cwb10

2seaoat



Those who stayed were probably right after being told it was a cat 4 and was really only a cat 1.......I can hear it now.....fake news.

RealLindaL



2seaoat wrote:Those who stayed were probably right after being told it was a cat 4 and was really only a cat 1.......I can hear it now.....fake news.

Fake news about people who stayed being pulled through the roofs of their flooded houses or otherwise needing rescue? Fake news about people who stayed being crushed by falling trees?

Tell it to the people who've died so far.

Deus X

Deus X

othershoe1030 wrote:As if the hurricane force winds weren't enough now it may be payback time for misusing Mother Earth.

Hurricane Florence’s potential for destruction also includes increased risks for the environment and public health as torrential rains could overwhelm the pits where toxic waste from power plants is stored. Animal-manure lagoons are also at risk of flooding.

Duke Energy Corp. was ordered two years ago to clean up coal-ash ponds in North Carolina that posed risks to the environment and public health. The company won’t be done in time for the storm, leaving the sites vulnerable to spills that can unleash the waste. The state is also a major producer of poultry and hogs, and man-made lagoons that hold manure also could be at risk of overflowing into fields and nearby waterways.

https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/southeast/2018/09/11/500732.htm


You nailed it! This is going to be a colossal environmental disaster.


Swollen N.C. rivers swamp dumps, raising water pollution fears

As rain from Florence continued to lash the Carolinas, the region's swollen rivers were beginning to swamp coal ash dumps and low-lying hog farms Sunday, raising concerns about water pollution.

Duke Energy said the collapse of a coal ash landfill at the L.V. Sutton Power Station near Wilmington, N.C., is an "ongoing situation," with an unknown amount of potentially contaminated storm water flowing into a nearby lake. At a different power plant near Goldsboro, three old coal ash dumps capped with a layer of soil were inundated by the Neuse River.

An Associated Press photographer who flew over eastern North Carolina on Sunday saw several flooded hog farms along the Trent River. It wasn't immediately clear if any animals remained inside the long metal buildings ringed by dark water.

An AP analysis of location data from hog waste disposal permits shows there are at least 45 active North Carolina farms located in 100-year and 500-year floodplains at risk of being inundated by nearby streams and rivers.


https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/09/16/coal-ash-landfill-collapses-in-north-carolina-after-torrential-rain-from-florence

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