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51 Re: Tariffs on 7/26/2018, 2:19 pm

Cmon...  



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52 Re: Tariffs on 7/26/2018, 3:07 pm

Yes.....lets ignore today and deflect.....how far back will suffice to give the aura of legitimacy.....too funny

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53 Re: Tariffs on 7/26/2018, 6:37 pm

Oh good... you draw upon a progressive of the first degree. A man that signed off on the biggest theft of our money system. It's really telling. You have no fucking idea what's going on. Never have... never will.

The federal reserve is a private cartel... under the guise of a part of govt. Guess what our debt would be without it?

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54 Re: Tariffs on 7/26/2018, 6:48 pm

gosh......you are easy.

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55 Re: Tariffs on 7/27/2018, 12:34 am

2seaoat wrote:gosh......you are easy.

And oh, so paranoid.

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56 Re: Tariffs on 7/27/2018, 1:48 am

RealLindaL wrote:And oh, so paranoid.

And oh, so ignorant! If the Federal Reserve had not lowered interest rates and used Quantitative Easing to inject billions into the financial system, the 2008 crash would have dwarfed the Great Depression. We'd still be feeling the effects today. Thank God for the Federal Reserve!

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57 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 12:34 pm

Suggestion:

Feed the soybeans to the coal miners.

Then feed the coal to the farmers.

Everybody wins.

MAGA

@Stonekettle


SHUT HER DOWN tRUMP!!!
Anybody want to bet on the shutdown. C'mon dollars to donuts. I say not a chance this year. So hang on farmers your welfare checks in the mail... If you are with 1 of the big Conglom-O Corporate farms. If not to bad so sad.

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58 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 12:50 pm

RealLindaL wrote:
2seaoat wrote:gosh......you are easy.

And oh, so paranoid.

In his defense, Pkr's only paranoid because everyone actually does hate him.

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59 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 3:36 pm

Not me.....I like him........we just do not agree on all things and have had civil conversations for years. I respect that he attempts to discuss issues when he is so outnumbered now in a discussion. It used to be many more agreed, but they have left the forum, or died.

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60 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 4:06 pm


He lied to Boards about my advice to Chrissy. I told her she was about to lose her job because she stated that her boss was noticing her internet activity. It was a warning, not a threat, although to refer to her as annoying doesn't even begin to touch the subject. She had been given plenty of leeway. Pkr tried to have me banned. I don't forget.

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61 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 5:59 pm

Oh, ye of little faith



Trump is finally vindicated on tariffs


The aggressive strategy President Trump has taken on trade was vindicated this week as European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker agreed to work toward the elimination of tariffs on U.S. industrial imports in return for the same treatment from the United States. This relationship will increase markets for American small business exporters, who face E.U. tariffs that are roughly 40 percent higher than those imposed by the United States, according to World Trade Organization data. It will also allow American consumers to purchase European goods at cheaper prices, putting more money in their pockets and stimulating the U.S. economy. Notably, the deal also includes promises from the European Union to import more soybeans and natural gas.

This trade agreement will be freer and fairer than the recent trading relationship between the two blocs. It is unlikely that it could have been achieved without the negotiating leverage provided by Trump’s recent tariffs on E.U. goods and threats of more to come. While critics of the administration have rightly pointed out that these tariffs act as a tax on American consumers and small businesses that use imports as inputs, they have not accounted for the fact that such pain in the short term is necessary for gain of a trade reset that equalizes tariffs in the long term.

With his business instincts, Trump likely recognizes that now is the perfect time to pursue such a trade reset and the temporary pain that goes along with it, given the current economic and labor market strength. Today, the Bureau of Economic Analysis announced that second quarter growth was at a strong 4.1 percent. The national unemployment rate has hit a generational low, with record low rates for minorities across the country. Small business confidence is soaring near a record high, and wages are growing at their fastest pace in a decade.

In other words, the economy can take the small hit associated with tariffs right now in return for the sustained prosperity that will come with freer and fairer trade. Just as any business person would do, you use the good times to fix the problems that existed in the bad times. The analogy of a broken arm here helps make the point: Resetting the fracture is painful but necessary for it to function at peak performance for the long term.

Now the trade attention shifts to China, which will be a more difficult negotiation. According to the World Trade Organization, Chinese tariffs are nearly three times larger than U.S. tariffs, putting American small business exporters at a competitive disadvantage with their Chinese competitors. There are also intellectual property concerns associated with Chinese manufacturers stealing patented U.S. technology.

But China is arguably a more important trading relationship than the one with the Europe Union. The Chinese middle class is bigger than the entire U.S. population. American exporters look at the Chinese market with dollar signs in their eyes. Many American farmers are dependent on the Chinese market. For example, one-third of soybeans, our second largest crop by a wide margin, grown in the United States are sold in China.

This is why Trump has taken an even more aggressive trade stance with China, placing tariffs on roughly half its imports and threatening tariffs on all of them. Like with the European Union, these tariffs put us in a better negotiating position to demand the reduction of Chinese trade barriers in order to expand markets for American small businesses and farmers.

American consumers and small businesses are hoping that the president can quickly replicate the newfound success with the European Union with China to negotiate a freer and fairer trading relationship with our Asian trading partner than what has existed in the past. This would put more money in the pockets of consumers and small businesses, stimulating the economy and labor markets even further, more than making up for any small economic contraction associated with temporary tariffs.

Trump is the first business president of the modern era. His negotiating tactics may be a little too tough for the Beltway elite. But as the deal with the European Union this week proves, they are exactly what is needed to fix this longstanding trade injustice for American businesses. With the strongest economic and labor market results in recent history, the president has earned some wiggle room to take some seemingly unorthodox moves for the betterment of our country in the future.

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62 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 9:36 pm

Why do you keep posting made up chit? The United States has been fighting trade issues since the forties. We have overwhelmingly gained from trade, and you think Trump yapping and doing NOTHING other than applying general tariffs is showing the world how tough we are......no we are showing the world what Americans are rapidly discovering.....President Trump cannot tell the truth, he lacks even cursory understanding of trade, and he expects stupid people to buy into his blunders as being something positive. The Koch brothers have been supporting conservative policies when Trump was a democrat supporting abortion and immigration reform, but they have made it clear.....he simply does not know what he is doing, and he is causing long term damage to America.....those folks were the Republican Party, so all that is left are stupid people and groupies who do not recognize the obvious. President Trump is a moron. I think his secretary of state called him a F'ing moron.......I do not know anybody who is a college graduate who does not now have reservations about this president's intellectual ability and veracity.

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63 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 9:40 pm

2seaoat wrote:....he simply does not know what he is doing,


The aggressive strategy President Trump has taken on trade was vindicated this week as European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker agreed to work toward the elimination of tariffs on U.S. industrial imports in return for the same treatment from the United States.

This trade agreement will be freer and fairer than the recent trading relationship between the two blocs. It is unlikely that it could have been achieved without the negotiating leverage provided by Trump’s recent tariffs on E.U. goods and threats of more to come. While critics of the administration have rightly pointed out that these tariffs act as a tax on American consumers and small businesses that use imports as inputs, they have not accounted for the fact that such pain in the short term is necessary for gain of a trade reset that equalizes tariffs in the long term.

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64 Re: Tariffs on 7/31/2018, 10:09 pm

While critics of the administration have rightly pointed out that these tariffs act as a tax on American consumers and small businesses

Yep, and the conservative brain trust of the Koch brothers have announced to the world that Trump is an idiot.......and Trump's response.....the Koch brothers are idiots........too funny. Trump has rolled over on his back like a dog who sees a bigger dog approaching......our cowardly bone spur bully.....is getting laughed at when he visits Britain......the streets filled up with people who were laughing at him.....do you understand when the people in your country are laughing at our leader, do you really think any leader in the world is not thinking.....how did this buffoon get elected?

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65 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 8:31 am

Floridatexan wrote:
He lied to Boards about my advice to Chrissy.  I told her she was about to lose her job because she stated that her boss was noticing her internet activity.  It was a warning, not a threat, although to refer to her as annoying doesn't even begin to touch the subject.  She had been given plenty of leeway.  Pkr tried to have me banned.  I don't forget.






Her pictures are long gone but the reactions to them are still up in the back pages. She seemed to enjoy posting private parts and various sex acts. Pkr tried to have me banned too. He deserves every ounce of pain that racks his body and then some. Karma is a bitch.

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66 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 9:32 am

ConservaLady wrote:Oh, ye of little faith



Trump is finally vindicated on tariffs


The aggressive strategy President Trump has taken on trade was vindicated this week as European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker agreed to work toward the elimination of tariffs on U.S. industrial imports in return for the same treatment from the United States. This relationship will increase markets for American small business exporters, who face E.U. tariffs that are roughly 40 percent higher than those imposed by the United States, according to World Trade Organization data. It will also allow American consumers to purchase European goods at cheaper prices, putting more money in their pockets and stimulating the U.S. economy. Notably, the deal also includes promises from the European Union to import more soybeans and natural gas.

This trade agreement will be freer and fairer than the recent trading relationship between the two blocs. It is unlikely that it could have been achieved without the negotiating leverage provided by Trump’s recent tariffs on E.U. goods and threats of more to come. While critics of the administration have rightly pointed out that these tariffs act as a tax on American consumers and small businesses that use imports as inputs, they have not accounted for the fact that such pain in the short term is necessary for gain of a trade reset that equalizes tariffs in the long term.

With his business instincts, Trump likely recognizes that now is the perfect time to pursue such a trade reset and the temporary pain that goes along with it, given the current economic and labor market strength. Today, the Bureau of Economic Analysis announced that second quarter growth was at a strong 4.1 percent. The national unemployment rate has hit a generational low, with record low rates for minorities across the country. Small business confidence is soaring near a record high, and wages are growing at their fastest pace in a decade.

In other words, the economy can take the small hit associated with tariffs right now in return for the sustained prosperity that will come with freer and fairer trade. Just as any business person would do, you use the good times to fix the problems that existed in the bad times. The analogy of a broken arm here helps make the point: Resetting the fracture is painful but necessary for it to function at peak performance for the long term.

Now the trade attention shifts to China, which will be a more difficult negotiation. According to the World Trade Organization, Chinese tariffs are nearly three times larger than U.S. tariffs, putting American small business exporters at a competitive disadvantage with their Chinese competitors. There are also intellectual property concerns associated with Chinese manufacturers stealing patented U.S. technology.

But China is arguably a more important trading relationship than the one with the Europe Union. The Chinese middle class is bigger than the entire U.S. population. American exporters look at the Chinese market with dollar signs in their eyes. Many American farmers are dependent on the Chinese market. For example, one-third of soybeans, our second largest crop by a wide margin, grown in the United States are sold in China.

This is why Trump has taken an even more aggressive trade stance with China, placing tariffs on roughly half its imports and threatening tariffs on all of them. Like with the European Union, these tariffs put us in a better negotiating position to demand the reduction of Chinese trade barriers in order to expand markets for American small businesses and farmers.

American consumers and small businesses are hoping that the president can quickly replicate the newfound success with the European Union with China to negotiate a freer and fairer trading relationship with our Asian trading partner than what has existed in the past. This would put more money in the pockets of consumers and small businesses, stimulating the economy and labor markets even further, more than making up for any small economic contraction associated with temporary tariffs.

Trump is the first business president of the modern era. His negotiating tactics may be a little too tough for the Beltway elite. But as the deal with the European Union this week proves, they are exactly what is needed to fix this longstanding trade injustice for American businesses. With the strongest economic and labor market results in recent history, the president has earned some wiggle room to take some seemingly unorthodox moves for the betterment of our country in the future.

LINK?

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67 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 10:15 am

ConservaLady wrote:Oh, ye of little faith


"Faith" being the operative word. "Faith" is what you rely upon when you don't have facts. And those aren't on your side.

You post mocking stuff about people clapping for Tinkerbell, but you're the one whose palms are sore. You keep proving it. Everything you do is just based on a "belief" that stuff's gonna work out, rather than actual hard-case nitty-gritty facts that show the trending is different.

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68 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 6:44 pm

Well it is not going to work out....he is now wanting a 25% tariff on more imports from China.....pig farmers are getting killed, and that is a tough business in the best of times. We have friends with a self contained pig operation who is getting killed. This is insane the damage which is being to these hard working productive farmers.

Trump will cave, we will lose billions in the numbskulls economic policies, and in typical fashion he will announce that he has done a better deal.......just like the Korea mission accomplished message, he got nothing, so now he is trying to talk to the Iranians, where he will announce his great deal.....it will not be, and finally he thinks the Chinese are going to cave.......why, Trump has already rolled over and proposed the farm subsidy......Every other nation now has his achilles heel.....punish the American farmer who will punish Trump.....too funny how the propagandist are already talking about the success of his strategy, but intelligent economist are going to start telling us about the cost.....for me goods are going to cost more......he is raising the tax on average Americans, and then probably making back room deals with Putin, the Russian Oligarchs, the Russian Mob, and the American mob as they play the future markets........I am certain this will be shown with time.

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69 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 7:03 pm

Interestingly, the tariff threat bumped up the much vaunted (by Trumpkins) recent 4.1% GDP number by 0.6%.   The Chinese prepurchased a lot of soybeans in anticipation of the tariff.



Here's What Impacted The June Quarter's GDP Growth


....

One-time impacts may mean 4% growth was a one-off event

The tax cuts and Trump’s tariffs unintended impacts could mean that the June quarter’s 4.1% growth rate won’t be repeated in the second half this year.[The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that 0.8% of the increase came from various legislation, including the tax cuts and 2018 spending deal, and that 0.6% came from Chinese pre-purchasing soybeans to beat the tariffs.  

....

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckjones/2018/07/28/heres-what-impacted-the-june-quarters-gdp/#4c541e21230f


Further, as to that 4.1% number (which would have been 3.5 without the Chinese soybean prepurchase due to the tariff threat) .... Obama topped it four times, as follows:

4th Quarter 2009 - 4.5%
4th Quarter 2011 - 4.7%
2nd Quarter 2014 - 5.1%
3rd Quarter 2014 - 4.9%

And I'm neither an Obama nor a Trump fan ... those are just the facts.

IMO, it remains to be seen how Trump's bull-in-the-China-shop trade gambit is going to play out.   Personally .... I'm skeptical.   I expect our major trade partners have probably already decided to just try and wait him out because they figure that:   A.  Trump has a short attention span, he'll be on to some other issue in six months and his whole "trade" thing will become less of a priority for him, and; B. he's not likely to be re-elected in 2020 anyway. But doubtless American consumers will pay a price for it in the meantime anyway.

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70 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 9:44 pm

The increased costs for us are very real, and the farmers in Illinois are piszed......welfare checks are in the mail. Trump pretending to be a Republican is shortly coming to an end.......he has no idea what the positions have been for thirty years....he just makes it up as he goes.

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71 Re: Tariffs on 8/1/2018, 10:45 pm

2seaoat wrote:The increased costs for us are very real, and the farmers in Illinois are piszed......welfare checks are in the mail.  

I thought Republicans were against "corporate welfare?"   Whatever happened to that?  R's and D's are each as big of hypocrites as the other, IMO.

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72 Re: Tariffs on 8/2/2018, 2:14 am

EmeraldGhost wrote:I thought Republicans were against "corporate welfare?"  

HA, that's rich!

The Republican Party has been the party of big business since...   ever!

They've been supporting goliath corporations with subsidies and tax breaks ever since I can remember.

The very word Republican is from the Latin repulsivus which means disgusting parasites sucking at the government teat.

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73 Re: Tariffs on 8/2/2018, 2:25 am

Trump Administration Threatens Even Higher Tariffs On China

President Trump is ratcheting up trade tensions with China, threatening to increase proposed tariffs on Chinese imports from 10 percent to 25 percent.

The higher tariffs, which would apply to some $200 billion in Chinese imports identified by the administration last month, represent an effort to get Beijing to address longstanding unfair trade practices, official say.

Chinese officials said they were prepared to retaliate again with higher tariffs of their own.


https://www.npr.org/2018/08/01/634696309/the-trump-administration-threatens-to-increase-china-tariffs

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74 Re: Tariffs on 8/2/2018, 12:30 pm

We pay. It is a tax. His co-conspirators play the future markets as he barks out absurd economic policies and the markets react. If he was an intelligent man, I would understand some kind of strategy, but I think he was oblivious on farm exports and what it means to Farmers. He sounds just like everybody I know who pretended to be a tough guy, but having never been in a real fight his entire life, when they get hit the first time.....they act surprised. Trump can give it, but he cannot take it.

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75 Re: Tariffs on 8/2/2018, 12:58 pm

2seaoat wrote:We pay.  It is a tax.  His co-conspirators play the future markets as he barks out absurd economic policies and the markets react.  If he was an intelligent man, I would understand some kind of strategy, but I think he was oblivious on farm exports and what it means to Farmers.  He sounds just like everybody I know who pretended to be a tough guy, but having never been in a real fight his entire life, when they get hit the first time.....they act surprised.  Trump can give it, but he cannot take it.

It's a double-tax, really. There's the initial tax -- sales the U.S. doesn't make and thus billions we lose -- and then the payback-subsidy paid to the farmers to make up for their losses. And, unlike all our other taxes, this is money that won't go back into the system and get used to build roads and bridges and other things that help pay for the upkeep of the nation. It's lose-lose.

A friend of mine told me last night that he'd just gotten back from the Mississippi delta and saw a lot of signs on farms that said, "WE FARM, AND WE VOTE." In freakin' Mississippi. If Trump's able to turn Mississippians against him, he's in dire straits.

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