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Tariffs

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1 Tariffs on 7/12/2018, 12:40 pm

Wow. I just got emails from two supply houses were I buy replacement parts for my Bobcat. First, the original OEM equipment from Bobcat is very expensive. These supply houses have dropped prices by forty percent and when you are talking about 2k for two rubber tracks, that is an eight hundred dollar saving.

The email said that they will be raising prices by 25%, and now I need to buy three roller bearings which normally are $750, will cost me a thousand dollars or right when I need to order the same a loss of $250......now I am going to join my farmer friends.......AMERICAN IDIOT

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2 Re: Tariffs on 7/12/2018, 8:47 pm

I need to replace those bearings, but have been too ill. I do not know if I will ever be well enough, but we have a local heavy equipment mechanic who will put the rubber track back on after we replace the bearings. and they send me a notice that Donald Trump just cost us $250 more. Free trade does not mean everybody has the best deal, rather that all gain.....some more than others. Well, the simple truth is that we have gained from free trade and these economic displacements were inevitable with economic comparative advantages evolving post wwII. We need micro product by product review on trade. Not a blanket of idiocy.

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3 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 8:55 am

The Trumpet really screwed the pooch on this tariff fiasco. Unfortunately the turd thinks he knows everything and doesn't listen to good business advice - if he is even getting any from his sycophants.

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4 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 9:55 am

We agree. I think a great many people will suffer because of his conclusion that everybody is a dummy. I think Presidents have always put tariffs on unfair trade practices, but the sanctions were not across the board and were product specific and continuous. I can either wait to see if he is going to roll this back, or waste an additional $250 getting the bearings in right now. My fear is they will lock up on the islands, and then I am looking at a $500 service call to get it out of the floodplain as a flood could happen at any moment and inundate the islands. I just got another email and this supplier will hold off the full 25% until they run out of their current inventory.

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5 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 10:39 am




From the W Bush era.
Still applies!

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6 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 12:08 pm

2seaoat wrote:I just got another email and this supplier will hold off the full 25% until they run out of their current inventory.

Gonna grab 'em now?

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7 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 3:12 pm

Gonna grab 'em now?

We had hoped to install the bearings in September or October when I will be doing some seeding and repairs if I have not passed. With me being so weak and it is 90 degrees out there right now, to get the bearings now will not work. I do not mind a 5% increase....that happens all the time, but the 25% is just stupid. I am also making some calls to other supply houses to get the best price on the bearings. The Chinese bearings do not hold up as well as the OEM bearings, but they will give a thousand hours of machine time.....and I will be long dead at that point.

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8 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 4:00 pm

2seaoat wrote:.....and I will be long dead at that point.

You been saying that for two years! I wouldn't count on it, if I were you. Get the OEMs.

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9 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 8:10 pm

The weight of our tremendous American economy can outlast all of the countries of the world combined in a so-called trade war. With President Trump we will no longer be taken advantage of.

Trade war? They will all buckle within twelve months if we keep the pressure on and our economy and place in the world will be far the better for it. So, bring it on, is what I say !

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10 Re: Tariffs on 7/13/2018, 8:49 pm

Actually over the last seventy years, the United States gained more from trade than any other nation in the history of the world. Trump simply is an uneducated man, who thinks he is smarter than he is. You tell caterpillar tractor or the American farmer to wait a few years.....we will win......too funny. South America is increasing agricultural production and although the American farmer can kick any nations asz.....they cannot do that with a 25% tariff on their product and putting a child at the controls of Air Force 1 will likely not have a good result............well I better not.........

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11 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 2:39 am

ConservaLady wrote:So, bring it on, is what I say !

So easy for you to say, especially if you're not being immediately and seriously impacted yourself as some businesses and individuals already are.   Further, be careful what you wish for.  What you may be "bringing on" is a full-blown U.S. recession.

Donald Trump is an ignorant, blithering conspiracy theorist idiot who is not merely an embarrassment but a serious danger to our nation and the world.

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12 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 5:17 am

RealLindaL wrote:
ConservaLady wrote:So, bring it on, is what I say !

So easy for you to say, especially if you're not being immediately and seriously impacted yourself as some businesses and individuals already are.   Further, be careful what you wish for.  What you may be "bringing on" is a full-blown U.S. recession.

Donald Trump is an ignorant, blithering conspiracy theorist idiot who is not merely an embarrassment but a serious danger to our nation and the world.




cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers

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13 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 7:43 am

It's funny that lefties want to socialize healthcare... but worry about tariff costs affecting farmers.

This won't last long... concessions are already being made by countries that have screwed us for decades.

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14 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 11:14 am

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15 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 11:47 am

So you think these tariffs are no big deal.....really? The same guy who complains about taxes is supporting a tax......this has nothing to do with politics, it has everything to do with common sense and education, both of which Trump has an immense shortage. Picking economic winners and certainly pocketing the money.....this man is doing NOTHING for America, but is doing everything for Donald.

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16 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 12:21 pm

I didn't say that... and it's not what he has stated he wants. But why should the deal be stacked against us?

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17 Re: Tariffs on 7/14/2018, 12:33 pm

But why should the deal be stacked against us?

The truth is that it is not. Trade is not a zero sum game. Two parties can gain from trade. One may have a greater advantage, but both gain. GATT trade negotiations have always been micro exercises with specific violations of unfair trade practices. They happen, and they have to be dealt with by both trading partners. However, macro solutions to trade will result in both parties losing and one party will lose more. If you think a trade war is winning for America, you are simply not familiar with the huge benefits of trade to the American economy. I am convinced this is his end game to become rich beyond his imagination. As he manipulates the markets, third parties are most certainly making money for Trump. This man is a pathological liar with zero morals or respect for the rule of law who as we speak is seeking profit with his office.

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18 Re: Tariffs on 7/16/2018, 1:42 am

ConservaLady wrote:The weight of our tremendous American economy can outlast all of the countries of the world combined in a so-called trade war.  With President Trump we will no longer be taken advantage of.

Trade war?   They will  all buckle within twelve months if we keep the pressure on and our economy and place in the world will be far the better for it.  So, bring it on, is what I say !

You're stupider than you've let on. We're going down fast.

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19 Re: Tariffs on 7/16/2018, 2:10 pm

ConservaLady wrote:The weight of our tremendous American economy can outlast all of the countries of the world combined in a so-called trade war.  With President Trump we will no longer be taken advantage of.

Trade war?   They will  all buckle within twelve months if we keep the pressure on and our economy and place in the world will be far the better for it.  So, bring it on, is what I say !

"Bring it on" is what a lot of people who have no clue how the global economy works might say. "Bring it on" has caused more people to fail horribly than "hold my beer."

All Trump has done was give the rest of the world an incentive to find ways to work around us... and they're already doing that. Trump has backed out of trade deals and made us a bad market, so new trade alliances are being formed and the United States is being cut out. Our businesses will suffer from Trump's idiotic fumbling far more than any other country will. Japan, in particular, is already profiting from this big time by picking up the TTP.

Trump has the rest of the world looking for ways to disregard America... and they're finding them. If you think that's something that you want to "bring on," I bet the Nigerian prince e-mailers and "I'm from Microsoft and we've detected bad activity from your account" scammers LOVE you.

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20 Re: Tariffs on 7/17/2018, 1:41 pm

Talk about blowing up in his face....see what oh brilliant one has done with tariffs on washing machines......https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/whirlpool-wanted-washer-wariffs-it-wasnt-ready-for-a-trade-showdown/ar-AAAadUL

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21 Re: Tariffs on 7/17/2018, 6:12 pm

Trump knows what he's doing.




Trump is winning the trade war because China has more to lose
BY LIZ PEEK, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 07/17/18 02:30 PM EDT 185 THE VIEWS EXPRESSED BY CONTRIBUTORS ARE THEIR OWN AND NOT THE VIEW OF THE HILL

Don’t look now, but there are numerous signs that President Trump is winning the trade war with China. While the battle over tariffs and protecting intellectual property may eventually damage the United States’ economy, there are signs that China is already paying a price for its refusal to bend to Trump’s demands.

One indicator of that price is the sharp plunge in China’s stock exchanges. Since the White House announced the first tariffs — on washing machines and solar cells on Jan. 22 — the Shanghai Index of Chinese stocks is down nearly 20 percent, while the S&P 500 is off less than 1 percent.

hat decline of share values is occurring in spite of the first-time inclusion in the MSCI, an important international index, of many Chinese stocks on June 1. That initial index listing attracted billions of dollars toward Chinese stocks, in expectation it would boost prices, but it did not.


What does that tell you? Investors think China has more to lose than the U.S. They are correct.

China’s government, determined to save face and match Trump’s tariff threats, is so concerned about the slide in share prices and what it might signal about the cost of the confrontation, that it will likely allow the $941 billion China Investment Corp. (CIC) to begin buying domestic stocks.

The sovereign wealth fund has petitioned to change its mandate, which formerly directed it to purchases of overseas shares; since most view the CIC as an arm of the Chinese government, the move may be interpreted as Beijing again intervening to prop up share prices.

It would not be the first time. From the middle of 2014 through the second quarter of 2015, Beijing encouraged China’s citizens to buy stocks, ballyhooing a booming economy and hinting that the government would stand behind markets.

Stocks soared as 38 million new accounts were opened, mainly by small investors. When share prices plunged in June 2015, officials stepped in to stabilize markets; the government intervened again later that year, loosening margin requirements, putting a “lockup” in place that prevented owners of large positions from dumping their positions while also banning short selling.

Most recently, the government reportedly stepped in this past March, hoping to stem a sharp selloff in share prices caused by fears of a trade war.

Another indication that Beijing is feeling the heat is that officials appear to be softening their bold “Made in China 2025” campaign. The Financial Times reported, “A propaganda directive leaked in late June ordered Chinese media no longer to refer to the term;"

The FT also noted: “Chinese leaders are also seeking to reassure foreign governments and companies that the programme is more benign than has been portrayed.”

Beijing is attempting to ally with the EU to push back against Trump’s trade stance; being less aggressive about dominating coveted industries is meant to help that effort.

Meanwhile, it’s not just Chinese stocks that have been walloped by trade concerns; the yuan has taken a beating, too. Since the end of March, when the battle over tariffs heated up, the yuan has slid nearly 7 percent, again demonstrating the impact the trade war might have on China’s economy.

After it hit a six-month low at the end of June, the government quietly stepped in to halt the slide, working through a large state-owned bank to sell dollars and prop up the yuan. Part of the currency’s weakness was attributed to a decision by China’s central bank to free up $100 billion in an attempt to boost lending and help out small businesses and state-owned firms threatened by escalating tariffs.

Meanwhile, growth in China is cooling. In the second quarter, the economy grew at 6.7 percent, the slowest rate since 2016. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) projected that China will grow 6.6 percent for the current year, but only 6.4 percent next year; in 2017 growth totaled 6.9 percent.
In describing the potential harm that might be done by Trump’s tariffs, the IMF economic guru Maury Obstfeld said recently: “As the focus of global retaliation, the United States finds a relatively high share of its exports taxed in global markets in such a broader trade conflict, and it is therefore especially vulnerable.”

Given that exports constitute 12 percent of the U.S. economy, versus 20 percent of China’s GDP and that the entire skirmish is over disparate tariffs (i.e., ours are higher) that seems more a political message than a reasonable assessment.

New numbers tell the story. China’s industrial production increased 6 percent year-over-year in June, short of an estimated 6.5 percent, while investment also was up only 6 percent.

By contrast, in the U.S., economic growth remains on the upswing, along with investment spending by businesses and industrial output. A recent NABE survey indicates that business economists are concerned about the effect of a trade war, but also bullish about the outlook for growth.

Specifically, they have substantially raised their expectations of industrial production, now looking for a gain of 3.8 percent this year, up from the 3.3-percent gain projected in March, and much higher than the 2.3 percent forecasted in the December survey.

Meanwhile, economists at ISI Evercore are reporting their private surveys of businesses support estimates that real GDP could grow at a nominal rate (including inflation) of 5.5 percent in the second quarter, a cyclical high.

The recent rise in retail sales, up 6.6 percent in June compared to last year, fuels continued optimism, as does data from the latest Empire State Manufacturing Survey, “suggesting a continuation of robust growth," according to the press release.

President Trump is rightly pushing back against decades of Chinese misbehavior, punishing Beijing for ongoing unfair trade practices and theft of intellectual property. His imposition of tariffs are meant to force a change by damaging China’s economy.

The risk is that China stands firm and fails to make the concessions demanded by the White House. In that scenario, global growth will suffer, but Beijing will likely suffer most. It appears they already are.

Liz Peek is a former partner of major bracket Wall Street firm Wertheim & Company. For 15 years, she has been a columnist for The Fiscal Times, Fox News, the New York Sun and numerous other organizations.


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22 Re: Tariffs on 7/18/2018, 8:44 am

The Russian and American mob have for the past year probably been shorting the chinese market, and investing in the winners or losers Trump declares. If you think the Chinese are going to LOSE a trade war.....that is too funny. They are patient and play a very good defensive strategy when facing an invader. Trumpvader is too weak to play with the chinese, and the proof in the pudding....how is the Korean talks going? They shived the Donald.

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23 Re: Tariffs on 7/18/2018, 8:47 am

Just like Puty is going to shiv him if he doesn't come through.

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24 Re: Tariffs on 7/18/2018, 9:46 am


Meanwhile, Japan and the EU have a new trade pact.

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25 Re: Tariffs on 7/18/2018, 9:52 am

I'd like to see a big push to enhance the south American markets for trade. There's a great need for development to pull these countries up. If we're going to get screwed anyway... why not make it a mutually beneficial investment.

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