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Czar 45 Resumes His Love Affair With Vlad Putin

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2seaoat wrote: This is a criminal investigation.  I hope to live long enough to hear from the grand juries.  

You still have the "indict a sitting President" problem. The BEST you can hope for is that he gets indicted and is found guilty AFTER he's out of office. Even then Pence, ala Jerry Ford, could pardon him for the Federal stuff and he might be able to work some kind of plea bargain deal with New York.

What exactly do you hope is going to happen? Other than a massive payday for the legal profession. Dershowitz has already indicated he's available.

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PkrBum wrote:
othershoe1030 wrote:
PkrBum wrote:There was no Steele or his Russian contacts prior to the dnc and Hillary funneling money to fusion gps.

Equivocate all you like. They were separate and distinct transactions... with vastly different results.

Do you have any references or documentation of any kind to back up this statement?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/conservative-website-first-paid-fusion-gps-for-trump-research/2017/10/27/ee05c1d6-bb6f-11e7-9e58-e6288544af98_story.html

In a statement, the Washington Free Beacon said it retained Fusion GPS to provide research on multiple Republican candidates in the 2016 presidential election. Two people familiar with billionaire GOP donor Paul Singer said he provides financial support to the publication. A spokesman for Singer’s firm, Elliott Management, did not respond to requests seeking comment.

The Free Beacon said its research ended before Fusion GPS hired a former British intelligence officer, Christopher Steele, to produce a series of reports alleging links between Russia and those close to Trump. That occurred after the firm was retained by a lawyer for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and the Democratic National Committee.

“None of the work product that the Free Beacon received appears in the Steele dossier,’’ said the statement from Free Beacon editor in chief Matthew Continetti and chairman Michael Goldfarb. “We stand by our reporting and we do not apologize for our methods.’’

It is standard practice to surveil Russian officials. Sometimes US citizens are caught up in this if they are communicating with them. Oops, that's how the FBI picked up the conversations between Russians and Carter Page and others. As I said before:

Also, it is of no importance WHO funded the research insofar as Steele was not directed to falsify anything, only to research.

The dossier is of no importance as far as the FISA warrant is concerned. What is remarkable is that Trump and his people are up to their necks in contacts, deals, and debts to the Russians. The Russians attacked our election system and continue to do so and according to reports nothing is being done to secure future elections because Trump refuses to acknowledge that such meddling occurred . The disturbing and very sad thing going on now is that

for the sake of an inexperienced, uninformed, dishonest political neophyte like 45 the Republicans in congress let him continue to tear down the very basics of our government all to protect this man.

This is not about Steele or who paid him. It is about the Russians using Trump to disrupt our political process.


Despite denials from the campaign and the White House, it is now clear that members of the Trump campaign interacted with Russians at least 31 times throughout the campaign. (There are at least 19 known meetings.) Knowledge of these communications went to the highest levels of Donald Trump’s operation — both Corey Lewandowski and Paul Manafort, two of the campaign’s three managers, were aware of it.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/wp/2017/11/13/all-of-the-known-times-the-trump-campaign-met-with-russians/?utm_term=.8ef8bd702fbe

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Again... the fisa court originally rejected the request for Trump campaign surveillance... which is highly rare for this secret court. Then additional information was presented and the warrant was issued. You don't seem to think it was Hillary's Russian dossier. How do you feel if it was? We'll find out soon I hope. I'd find it a crime.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_of_the_poisonous_tree

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PkrBum wrote:Again... the fisa court originally rejected the request for Trump campaign surveillance... which is highly rare for this secret court. Then additional information was presented and the warrant was issued. You don't seem to think it was Hillary's Russian dossier. How do you feel if it was? We'll find out soon I hope. I'd find it a crime.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_of_the_poisonous_tree

I've had affidavits rejected.   Ya really wanna try not & have that happen because it's not good for your career or your reputation with the USAO and the Judges in your area  .... but sooner or later it happens to almost every field investigator if they stay in the biz long enough.

Having to resubmit a previously flawed affidavit is not that uncommon .... and the fact a previous one was rejected doesn't really say anything one way or the other about the facts contained within the affidavit the Judge finally approved.

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Report: Papadopoulos, Not Dossier, Sparked Russia Investigation

A juicy New York Times report published Saturday reveals that George Papadopoulos, the Trump foreign-policy adviser who was indicted in October, inadvertently set off the FBI investigation into Russian electoral interference that has become an existential threat to the president.

It all began, as so many memorable tales do, with a night of “heavy drinking at an upscale London bar.” It was May of 2016, and Papadopoulos was knocking back some Pimm’s cups (we can only imagine) with Australia’s top diplomat in the U.K. when he decided to divulge some very interesting information: Russia was in possession of damaging information about Hillary Clinton.

Exactly how much Mr. Papadopoulos said that night at the Kensington Wine Rooms with the Australian, Alexander Downer, is unclear. But two months later, when leaked Democratic emails began appearing online, Australian officials passed the information about Mr. Papadopoulos to their American counterparts, according to four current and former American and foreign officials with direct knowledge of the Australians’ role.

The hacking and the revelation that a member of the Trump campaign may have had inside information about it were driving factors that led the F.B.I. to open an investigation in July 2016 into Russia’s attempts to disrupt the election and whether any of President Trump’s associates conspired.

Together with more information about the Trump/Russia connection from the British and Dutch governments, plus a suspicious trip to Moscow by Trump adviser Carter Page, the FBI decided it had enough to open an investigation, which it kept quiet throughout the election — too quiet, Democrats charge. The probe eventually developed into the ongoing effort headed by special counsel Robert Mueller. Papadopoulos’s indictment, for lying to the FBI, was seen as a particularly worrying sign for the Trump administration because of his direct involvement with Russians who had offered the campaign the dirt on Clinton in the form of hacked emails.

The timing of Papadopoulos’s ill-fated remarks at the London bar are key. In an effort to discredit the Russia investigation, Republican commentators have been pushing the notion that the FBI began its inquiry on the basis of the now-infamous “Steele Dossier,” the document put together by ex–British spy Christopher Steele, which alleged that Russia interfered in the election and had possible “kompromat” on President Trump. Republicans claim that the dossier is full of misinformation, and that, since the Democratic National Committee paid the firm that employed Steele, the document — and thus Mueller’s investigation — was tainted from the start

But the Times article makes it clear that it was Papadopoulos, not Steele, who drove the investigation, at least in the beginning. This blows up an important line of attack for Republicans looking to tar Mueller — though undoubtedly they’ll find other ways to do it.

The Times article also provides more detail about the labryinthine path through which Papadopoulos attempted to set up a meeting between Trump and Vladimir Putin. And it puts to bed the notion, advanced by the Trump team, that the previously inexperienced Papadopoulos was an inconsequential figure on the campaign, or a “coffee boy,” in the words of ex-adviser Michael Caputo. Papadopoulos was actually a mainstay among the ragtag group of advisers that helped propel Trump to the Republican nomination. And he helped edit Trump’s first major foreign-policy speech, in April of 2016, in which the president expressed his wish for warmer relations with Russia.

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/12/report-papadopoulos-sparked-russia-investigation.html

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Floridatexan wrote:
Report: Papadopoulos, Not Dossier, Sparked Russia Investigation

A juicy New York Times report published Saturday reveals that George Papadopoulos, the Trump foreign-policy adviser who was indicted in October, inadvertently set off the FBI investigation into Russian electoral interference that has become an existential threat to the president.

It all began, as so many memorable tales do, with a night of “heavy drinking at an upscale London bar.” It was May of 2016, and Papadopoulos was knocking back some Pimm’s cups (we can only imagine) with Australia’s top diplomat in the U.K. when he decided to divulge some very interesting information: Russia was in possession of damaging information about Hillary Clinton.

Exactly how much Mr. Papadopoulos said that night at the Kensington Wine Rooms with the Australian, Alexander Downer, is unclear. But two months later, when leaked Democratic emails began appearing online, Australian officials passed the information about Mr. Papadopoulos to their American counterparts, according to four current and former American and foreign officials with direct knowledge of the Australians’ role.

The hacking and the revelation that a member of the Trump campaign may have had inside information about it were driving factors that led the F.B.I. to open an investigation in July 2016 into Russia’s attempts to disrupt the election and whether any of President Trump’s associates conspired.

Together with more information about the Trump/Russia connection from the British and Dutch governments, plus a suspicious trip to Moscow by Trump adviser Carter Page, the FBI decided it had enough to open an investigation, which it kept quiet throughout the election — too quiet, Democrats charge. The probe eventually developed into the ongoing effort headed by special counsel Robert Mueller. Papadopoulos’s indictment, for lying to the FBI, was seen as a particularly worrying sign for the Trump administration because of his direct involvement with Russians who had offered the campaign the dirt on Clinton in the form of hacked emails.

The timing of Papadopoulos’s ill-fated remarks at the London bar are key. In an effort to discredit the Russia investigation, Republican commentators have been pushing the notion that the FBI began its inquiry on the basis of the now-infamous “Steele Dossier,” the document put together by ex–British spy Christopher Steele, which alleged that Russia interfered in the election and had possible “kompromat” on President Trump. Republicans claim that the dossier is full of misinformation, and that, since the Democratic National Committee paid the firm that employed Steele, the document — and thus Mueller’s investigation — was tainted from the start

But the Times article makes it clear that it was Papadopoulos, not Steele, who drove the investigation, at least in the beginning. This blows up an important line of attack for Republicans looking to tar Mueller — though undoubtedly they’ll find other ways to do it.

The Times article also provides more detail about the labryinthine path through which Papadopoulos attempted to set up a meeting between Trump and Vladimir Putin. And it puts to bed the notion, advanced by the Trump team, that the previously inexperienced Papadopoulos was an inconsequential figure on the campaign, or a “coffee boy,” in the words of ex-adviser Michael Caputo. Papadopoulos was actually a mainstay among the ragtag group of advisers that helped propel Trump to the Republican nomination. And he helped edit Trump’s first major foreign-policy speech, in April of 2016, in which the president expressed his wish for warmer relations with Russia.

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/12/report-papadopoulos-sparked-russia-investigation.html





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