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Republican incompetence has now put 9 million children in danger

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Federal funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which provides health coverage for almost nine million children, ran out on Saturday night. Everyone in Congress knew the deadline was approaching. By all accounts, an overwhelming bipartisan majority of lawmakers even wanted to renew it. Yet it didn't happen.

The whole mess is a microcosm for the malignant incompetence of the Republican-led government.

Created under President Clinton in 1997, CHIP was designed to provide decent medical coverage to children whose families make too little to purchase it on their own, but also too much to qualify for Medicaid. It covers everything from dental and eye care to immunizations to emergency visits and more. Under CHIP, routine doctor visits are free, and while there can be cost-sharing for other medical services, no one has to pay more than 5 percent of their annual family income. The program knocked the uninsurance rate for children down from 14 percent at its inception to 4.5 percent by 2015. Today, CHIP covers 8.9 million children — the vast majority from families who make twice the poverty level at most — and another 370,000 pregnant women.

Like Medicaid, CHIP runs off a combination of federal and state funding, with the former contributing around $14 billion per year. Unfortunately, the federal contribution is not open-ended: It has to be renewed every few years. The last renewal was in 2015, for two years. It ran out on Sept. 30.

The states have a little bit of a cushion. They don't burn through the federal money all at once, and leftover funds can be rolled over into the following year's funding. But the situation is tight. One projection shows Washington, D.C., Arizona, Minnesota, and North Carolina running through their remaining federal funds by the end of 2017. The worst-case scenario is that much bigger states like California also bleed dry by the end of the year. By June 2018, every state except Wyoming is expected to exhaust their federal money as well. (Wyoming will join them by September.) The inevitable results will be state budget chaos, confusion among enrollees, people denied enrollment, cuts to payments for care, and more.

How did this happen? The answer, put simply, is the Republican Congress' obsession with killing ObamaCare.

Part of the problem was that ObamaCare actually increased CHIP's federal contribution by 23 percent. So the generally bipartisan support for CHIP was complicated by the GOP's unyielding belief that everything associated with ObamaCare is unacceptable and must go. Yet even then, Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) were able to hammer out an agreement that would've extended CHIP funding for five years while slowly winding down the ObamaCare increase. What happened next was that Republicans decided to take one last shot at killing ObamaCare with the Cassidy-Graham health-care bill just as CHIP's funding deadline loomed, and the Senate simply didn't have the attention for anything else.

"Momentum was building," Bruce Lesley, the president of First Focus, a children’s advocacy group in Washington, told the Los Angeles Times. But once the Cassidy-Graham brouhaha started, "we couldn’t even get a meeting," Lesley said. "No one was even taking our calls."

In fact, CHIP wasn't the only health-care funding that quietly died during that fight. The federal government's Community Health Center Fund provides around $3.6 billion annually around the country. That's 70 percent of all the federal money that goes to community health centers, and about 20 percent of the total annual funding they receive. Without that money, observers are anticipating that 2,800 health-care facilities across America will close, killing 50,000 jobs for care providers and other staff. The fund was renewed in 2015 for two years, and also expired on Saturday.

"Twenty-five million Americans use these centers each year, nearly three-quarters of them below the poverty line," David Dayen explained in The New Republic. "An estimated nine million would be left with no medical home if funding expires."

Now that the Republicans' fourth effort to kill ObamaCare has died with an ignominious whimper, lawmakers are suddenly hearing the public outcry over the expired funding. Hatch and Wyden's compromise is still alive in the Senate, and Axios reported the Senate Finance Committee will mark the bill up on Wednesday. Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) have also introduced legislation to extend community health center funding another five years. And the Energy and Commerce Committee is scheduled to mark up legislation on both questions this week as well.

So it's possible Congress could still get its act together in relatively short order.

But the fact that we even reached this point speaks volumes. It wasn't as if Congress was tripped up by an actual crisis. Puerto Rico is certainly dealing with monumental devastation from Hurricane Maria. But that wasn't what the Senate was debating. Nor can the oversight be laid purely at the feet of President Trump, blinkered as he is.

All four attempts to kill ObamaCare have been utterly vapid exercises, marred by policy illiteracy, and driven solely by seven years of Republican ideological fever and empty promises to "repeal and replace" the Democrats' health-care law — never mind the catastrophic consequences for millions of Americans. Funding for CHIP and community health centers were both far more straightforward matters of extending existing programs — and for far less money that what was at stake in the various TrumpCare bills. Yet it was in the name of pursuing their ridiculous quest, even after three successive failures, that Republican congressional leadership allowed those critical programs to run aground.

Of course, in a better world federal funding for CHIP and the Community Health Center Fund would never be designed to expire in the first place. But in the world we live in, Congress and the president should renew these programs in a timely manner. Competent and humane governance requires at least that much.

http://theweek.com/articles/728262/republican-incompetence-now-9-million-children-danger?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=afternoon&utm_medium=10_03_17-most_popular_4-728262

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Killing Chip is an outrage. So many children have been saved under this umbrella as folks lose jobs, or face divorce. It is beyond moral reprehension as the estate tax gives the Trump family one billion dollars when tossed, yet insuring children allows them to balance the budget on children......I am simply getting more angry every day. Sometimes this becomes more insufferable than anything I am about to face. How can they play these types of games with children. I know kids who were on this program. It once had bipartisan support, but now the avarice and greed is simply pathological.....I do not know this country anymore.

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2seaoat wrote:Killing Chip is an outrage.  So many children have been saved under this umbrella as folks lose jobs, or face divorce.   It is beyond moral reprehension as the estate tax gives the Trump family one billion dollars when tossed, yet insuring children allows them to balance the budget on children......I am simply getting more angry every day.   Sometimes this becomes more insufferable than anything I am about to face.  How can they play these types of games with children.   I know kids who were on this program.  It once had bipartisan support, but now the avarice and greed is simply pathological.....I do not know this country anymore.

Oh, ferchristsakes, Seaoat, read a little history. This is the same crap that has been going on since FDR and the New Deal--the same arguments: creeping socialism, godless communism, antisemitism of the "Karl Marx was Jew" variety, white supremacy, the destruction of Christian civilization, states rights, fascism, blah-blah-blah. This shit has been going on for eighty years! PkrBoy and ALTLEFTDOOFUS roll out the same arguments time-after-time.

And they use one of the points you're proud of: fiscal conservatism. The Federal government IS NOT a household or business that has to rely on income to pay its bills. The debt ceiling is nothing more than a political attempt to stifle social spending. We as a nation could provide single-payer for all with NO damage to the economy. As a matter of fact, it would probably BOOST the economy because employers would no longer have to bear the burden of insurance for their workers.

The debt hawks rave about the collapse of the country if the national debt crosses the 100%-of-GDP barrier and it's complete horseshit! Japan has been running at 200% for twenty years trying to jump start their sluggish economy and they haven't collapsed.

Every time I hear this "balance the budget" horseshit I get angry because I know I'm listening to someone who doesn't really know fuck-all about the nature of money using fear tactics to scare people into cravenly abandoning their fellow citizens who are lying wounded on the field of commerce.

Fiscal and social conservatives are all moral cowards. PkrBoy, ALTLEFTDOOFUS, Gatorfan and the rest are the kind of cowards who would have hidden UNDER women and children at Las Vegas rather than protecting them. They hate the notion of altruism despite the fact that most of the medals and awards given for military valor are for risking one's life to save another.

They're shitty, selfish human beings and the sooner they are shamed into silence and shunned by decent people the better off we'll all be.

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Floridatexan wrote:Federal funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which provides health coverage for almost nine million children, ran out on Saturday night. Everyone in Congress knew the deadline was approaching. By all accounts, an overwhelming bipartisan majority of lawmakers even wanted to renew it. Yet it didn't happen.

The whole mess is a microcosm for the malignant incompetence of the Republican-led government.

Created under President Clinton in 1997, CHIP was designed to provide decent medical coverage to children whose families make too little to purchase it on their own, but also too much to qualify for Medicaid. It covers everything from dental and eye care to immunizations to emergency visits and more. Under CHIP, routine doctor visits are free, and while there can be cost-sharing for other medical services, no one has to pay more than 5 percent of their annual family income. The program knocked the uninsurance rate for children down from 14 percent at its inception to 4.5 percent by 2015. Today, CHIP covers 8.9 million children — the vast majority from families who make twice the poverty level at most — and another 370,000 pregnant women.

Like Medicaid, CHIP runs off a combination of federal and state funding, with the former contributing around $14 billion per year. Unfortunately, the federal contribution is not open-ended: It has to be renewed every few years. The last renewal was in 2015, for two years. It ran out on Sept. 30.

The states have a little bit of a cushion. They don't burn through the federal money all at once, and leftover funds can be rolled over into the following year's funding. But the situation is tight. One projection shows Washington, D.C., Arizona, Minnesota, and North Carolina running through their remaining federal funds by the end of 2017. The worst-case scenario is that much bigger states like California also bleed dry by the end of the year. By June 2018, every state except Wyoming is expected to exhaust their federal money as well. (Wyoming will join them by September.) The inevitable results will be state budget chaos, confusion among enrollees, people denied enrollment, cuts to payments for care, and more.

How did this happen? The answer, put simply, is the Republican Congress' obsession with killing ObamaCare.

Part of the problem was that ObamaCare actually increased CHIP's federal contribution by 23 percent. So the generally bipartisan support for CHIP was complicated by the GOP's unyielding belief that everything associated with ObamaCare is unacceptable and must go. Yet even then, Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) were able to hammer out an agreement that would've extended CHIP funding for five years while slowly winding down the ObamaCare increase. What happened next was that Republicans decided to take one last shot at killing ObamaCare with the Cassidy-Graham health-care bill just as CHIP's funding deadline loomed, and the Senate simply didn't have the attention for anything else.

"Momentum was building," Bruce Lesley, the president of First Focus, a children’s advocacy group in Washington, told the Los Angeles Times. But once the Cassidy-Graham brouhaha started, "we couldn’t even get a meeting," Lesley said. "No one was even taking our calls."

In fact, CHIP wasn't the only health-care funding that quietly died during that fight. The federal government's Community Health Center Fund provides around $3.6 billion annually around the country. That's 70 percent of all the federal money that goes to community health centers, and about 20 percent of the total annual funding they receive. Without that money, observers are anticipating that 2,800 health-care facilities across America will close, killing 50,000 jobs for care providers and other staff. The fund was renewed in 2015 for two years, and also expired on Saturday.

"Twenty-five million Americans use these centers each year, nearly three-quarters of them below the poverty line," David Dayen explained in The New Republic. "An estimated nine million would be left with no medical home if funding expires."

Now that the Republicans' fourth effort to kill ObamaCare has died with an ignominious whimper, lawmakers are suddenly hearing the public outcry over the expired funding. Hatch and Wyden's compromise is still alive in the Senate, and Axios reported the Senate Finance Committee will mark the bill up on Wednesday. Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) have also introduced legislation to extend community health center funding another five years. And the Energy and Commerce Committee is scheduled to mark up legislation on both questions this week as well.

So it's possible Congress could still get its act together in relatively short order.

But the fact that we even reached this point speaks volumes. It wasn't as if Congress was tripped up by an actual crisis. Puerto Rico is certainly dealing with monumental devastation from Hurricane Maria. But that wasn't what the Senate was debating. Nor can the oversight be laid purely at the feet of President Trump, blinkered as he is.

All four attempts to kill ObamaCare have been utterly vapid exercises, marred by policy illiteracy, and driven solely by seven years of Republican ideological fever and empty promises to "repeal and replace" the Democrats' health-care law — never mind the catastrophic consequences for millions of Americans. Funding for CHIP and community health centers were both far more straightforward matters of extending existing programs — and for far less money that what was at stake in the various TrumpCare bills. Yet it was in the name of pursuing their ridiculous quest, even after three successive failures, that Republican congressional leadership allowed those critical programs to run aground.

Of course, in a better world federal funding for CHIP and the Community Health Center Fund would never be designed to expire in the first place. But in the world we live in, Congress and the president should renew these programs in a timely manner. Competent and humane governance requires at least that much.

http://theweek.com/articles/728262/republican-incompetence-now-9-million-children-danger?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=afternoon&utm_medium=10_03_17-most_popular_4-728262

************


Reality - the GOP cannot trust you liberals to vote on a bill and not add more pork to it for your other special interests. That's the bottom line here.

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ALTLEFTCRIMINALS wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:Federal funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which provides health coverage for almost nine million children, ran out on Saturday night. Everyone in Congress knew the deadline was approaching. By all accounts, an overwhelming bipartisan majority of lawmakers even wanted to renew it. Yet it didn't happen.

The whole mess is a microcosm for the malignant incompetence of the Republican-led government.

Created under President Clinton in 1997, CHIP was designed to provide decent medical coverage to children whose families make too little to purchase it on their own, but also too much to qualify for Medicaid. It covers everything from dental and eye care to immunizations to emergency visits and more. Under CHIP, routine doctor visits are free, and while there can be cost-sharing for other medical services, no one has to pay more than 5 percent of their annual family income. The program knocked the uninsurance rate for children down from 14 percent at its inception to 4.5 percent by 2015. Today, CHIP covers 8.9 million children — the vast majority from families who make twice the poverty level at most — and another 370,000 pregnant women.

Like Medicaid, CHIP runs off a combination of federal and state funding, with the former contributing around $14 billion per year. Unfortunately, the federal contribution is not open-ended: It has to be renewed every few years. The last renewal was in 2015, for two years. It ran out on Sept. 30.

The states have a little bit of a cushion. They don't burn through the federal money all at once, and leftover funds can be rolled over into the following year's funding. But the situation is tight. One projection shows Washington, D.C., Arizona, Minnesota, and North Carolina running through their remaining federal funds by the end of 2017. The worst-case scenario is that much bigger states like California also bleed dry by the end of the year. By June 2018, every state except Wyoming is expected to exhaust their federal money as well. (Wyoming will join them by September.) The inevitable results will be state budget chaos, confusion among enrollees, people denied enrollment, cuts to payments for care, and more.

How did this happen? The answer, put simply, is the Republican Congress' obsession with killing ObamaCare.

Part of the problem was that ObamaCare actually increased CHIP's federal contribution by 23 percent. So the generally bipartisan support for CHIP was complicated by the GOP's unyielding belief that everything associated with ObamaCare is unacceptable and must go. Yet even then, Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) were able to hammer out an agreement that would've extended CHIP funding for five years while slowly winding down the ObamaCare increase. What happened next was that Republicans decided to take one last shot at killing ObamaCare with the Cassidy-Graham health-care bill just as CHIP's funding deadline loomed, and the Senate simply didn't have the attention for anything else.

"Momentum was building," Bruce Lesley, the president of First Focus, a children’s advocacy group in Washington, told the Los Angeles Times. But once the Cassidy-Graham brouhaha started, "we couldn’t even get a meeting," Lesley said. "No one was even taking our calls."

In fact, CHIP wasn't the only health-care funding that quietly died during that fight. The federal government's Community Health Center Fund provides around $3.6 billion annually around the country. That's 70 percent of all the federal money that goes to community health centers, and about 20 percent of the total annual funding they receive. Without that money, observers are anticipating that 2,800 health-care facilities across America will close, killing 50,000 jobs for care providers and other staff. The fund was renewed in 2015 for two years, and also expired on Saturday.

"Twenty-five million Americans use these centers each year, nearly three-quarters of them below the poverty line," David Dayen explained in The New Republic. "An estimated nine million would be left with no medical home if funding expires."

Now that the Republicans' fourth effort to kill ObamaCare has died with an ignominious whimper, lawmakers are suddenly hearing the public outcry over the expired funding. Hatch and Wyden's compromise is still alive in the Senate, and Axios reported the Senate Finance Committee will mark the bill up on Wednesday. Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) have also introduced legislation to extend community health center funding another five years. And the Energy and Commerce Committee is scheduled to mark up legislation on both questions this week as well.

So it's possible Congress could still get its act together in relatively short order.

But the fact that we even reached this point speaks volumes. It wasn't as if Congress was tripped up by an actual crisis. Puerto Rico is certainly dealing with monumental devastation from Hurricane Maria. But that wasn't what the Senate was debating. Nor can the oversight be laid purely at the feet of President Trump, blinkered as he is.

All four attempts to kill ObamaCare have been utterly vapid exercises, marred by policy illiteracy, and driven solely by seven years of Republican ideological fever and empty promises to "repeal and replace" the Democrats' health-care law — never mind the catastrophic consequences for millions of Americans. Funding for CHIP and community health centers were both far more straightforward matters of extending existing programs — and for far less money that what was at stake in the various TrumpCare bills. Yet it was in the name of pursuing their ridiculous quest, even after three successive failures, that Republican congressional leadership allowed those critical programs to run aground.

Of course, in a better world federal funding for CHIP and the Community Health Center Fund would never be designed to expire in the first place. But in the world we live in, Congress and the president should renew these programs in a timely manner. Competent and humane governance requires at least that much.

http://theweek.com/articles/728262/republican-incompetence-now-9-million-children-danger?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=afternoon&utm_medium=10_03_17-most_popular_4-728262

************


Reality - the GOP cannot trust you liberals to vote on a bill and not add more pork to it for your other special interests. That's the bottom line here.  

Some teacher...you don't give a damn about kids. Please STFU.

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ALTLEFTCRIMINALS wrote:

Reality - the GOP cannot trust you liberals to vote on a bill and not add more pork to it for your other special interests. That's the bottom line here.  

The "bottom line" is who gets the pork, you dumb ass: the least and lost and left behind or the multi-national corporations and the rich and powerful.

You're a fucking coward who wants to leave the wounded to die on the field. Wise the fuck up!

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When the Son of man shall come in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then shall he sit upon the throne of his glory: And before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats: And he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left.

Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in: Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me. Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.

Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels: For I was an hungred, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me not in: naked, and ye clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not. Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee? Then shall he answer them, saying, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me. And these shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal.

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Deus X wrote:
ALTLEFTCRIMINALS wrote:

Reality - the GOP cannot trust you liberals to vote on a bill and not add more pork to it for your other special interests. That's the bottom line here.  

The "bottom line" is who gets the pork, you dumb ass: the least and lost and left behind or the multi-national corporations and the rich and powerful.

You're a fucking coward who wants to leave the wounded to die on the field. Wise the fuck up!






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When I was 5 years old, I went to a political rally at Brownsville Elementary here in Pensacola. It used to be in the same building the Brownsville Assembly of God now occupies.
Everybody there was wearing an "I Like Ike" button. I didn't know why back then, but when I grew up and learned a little about history, I figured it out.
A biography of Eisenhower was the first biography I remember reading. I was in the fourth grade. I still remember reading about him nearly dying as a child.
That same year, I remember I also read a bio of Robert E Lee. Those biographies set me on a lifetime of liking to read non-fiction over fiction.

Ike would have been a Democrat if he were alive today. No way anyone who cared as much about others could be a Republican.
One other thing I remember reading about him was that he said no soldier under his command ever died for the flag, for patriotism, or even for their country. He said soldiers die for the guy standing next to them. They die to protect their friends.
Pretty wise man, in my opinion. It definitely takes a lot of the BS away from flag worshiping war lovers.

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I've got some complaints. But I've expressed them to counter seagoat numerous times.

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PkrBum wrote:I've got some complaints. But I've expressed them to counter seagoat numerous times.

OK, inscrutable one, state your objections to health care for kids whose parents probably couldn't afford it otherwise.

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Floridatexan wrote:
PkrBum wrote:I've got some complaints. But I've expressed them to counter seagoat numerous times.

OK, inscrutable one, state your objections to health care for kids whose parents probably couldn't afford it otherwise.

I was replying to Eisenhower being brought up.

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ALTLEFTCRIMINALS wrote:
Floridatexan wrote:Federal funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which provides health coverage for almost nine million children, ran out on Saturday night. Everyone in Congress knew the deadline was approaching. By all accounts, an overwhelming bipartisan majority of lawmakers even wanted to renew it. Yet it didn't happen.

The whole mess is a microcosm for the malignant incompetence of the Republican-led government.

Created under President Clinton in 1997, CHIP was designed to provide decent medical coverage to children whose families make too little to purchase it on their own, but also too much to qualify for Medicaid. It covers everything from dental and eye care to immunizations to emergency visits and more. Under CHIP, routine doctor visits are free, and while there can be cost-sharing for other medical services, no one has to pay more than 5 percent of their annual family income. The program knocked the uninsurance rate for children down from 14 percent at its inception to 4.5 percent by 2015. Today, CHIP covers 8.9 million children — the vast majority from families who make twice the poverty level at most — and another 370,000 pregnant women.

Like Medicaid, CHIP runs off a combination of federal and state funding, with the former contributing around $14 billion per year. Unfortunately, the federal contribution is not open-ended: It has to be renewed every few years. The last renewal was in 2015, for two years. It ran out on Sept. 30.

The states have a little bit of a cushion. They don't burn through the federal money all at once, and leftover funds can be rolled over into the following year's funding. But the situation is tight. One projection shows Washington, D.C., Arizona, Minnesota, and North Carolina running through their remaining federal funds by the end of 2017. The worst-case scenario is that much bigger states like California also bleed dry by the end of the year. By June 2018, every state except Wyoming is expected to exhaust their federal money as well. (Wyoming will join them by September.) The inevitable results will be state budget chaos, confusion among enrollees, people denied enrollment, cuts to payments for care, and more.

How did this happen? The answer, put simply, is the Republican Congress' obsession with killing ObamaCare.

Part of the problem was that ObamaCare actually increased CHIP's federal contribution by 23 percent. So the generally bipartisan support for CHIP was complicated by the GOP's unyielding belief that everything associated with ObamaCare is unacceptable and must go. Yet even then, Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) were able to hammer out an agreement that would've extended CHIP funding for five years while slowly winding down the ObamaCare increase. What happened next was that Republicans decided to take one last shot at killing ObamaCare with the Cassidy-Graham health-care bill just as CHIP's funding deadline loomed, and the Senate simply didn't have the attention for anything else.

"Momentum was building," Bruce Lesley, the president of First Focus, a children’s advocacy group in Washington, told the Los Angeles Times. But once the Cassidy-Graham brouhaha started, "we couldn’t even get a meeting," Lesley said. "No one was even taking our calls."

In fact, CHIP wasn't the only health-care funding that quietly died during that fight. The federal government's Community Health Center Fund provides around $3.6 billion annually around the country. That's 70 percent of all the federal money that goes to community health centers, and about 20 percent of the total annual funding they receive. Without that money, observers are anticipating that 2,800 health-care facilities across America will close, killing 50,000 jobs for care providers and other staff. The fund was renewed in 2015 for two years, and also expired on Saturday.

"Twenty-five million Americans use these centers each year, nearly three-quarters of them below the poverty line," David Dayen explained in The New Republic. "An estimated nine million would be left with no medical home if funding expires."

Now that the Republicans' fourth effort to kill ObamaCare has died with an ignominious whimper, lawmakers are suddenly hearing the public outcry over the expired funding. Hatch and Wyden's compromise is still alive in the Senate, and Axios reported the Senate Finance Committee will mark the bill up on Wednesday. Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) have also introduced legislation to extend community health center funding another five years. And the Energy and Commerce Committee is scheduled to mark up legislation on both questions this week as well.

So it's possible Congress could still get its act together in relatively short order.

But the fact that we even reached this point speaks volumes. It wasn't as if Congress was tripped up by an actual crisis. Puerto Rico is certainly dealing with monumental devastation from Hurricane Maria. But that wasn't what the Senate was debating. Nor can the oversight be laid purely at the feet of President Trump, blinkered as he is.

All four attempts to kill ObamaCare have been utterly vapid exercises, marred by policy illiteracy, and driven solely by seven years of Republican ideological fever and empty promises to "repeal and replace" the Democrats' health-care law — never mind the catastrophic consequences for millions of Americans. Funding for CHIP and community health centers were both far more straightforward matters of extending existing programs — and for far less money that what was at stake in the various TrumpCare bills. Yet it was in the name of pursuing their ridiculous quest, even after three successive failures, that Republican congressional leadership allowed those critical programs to run aground.

Of course, in a better world federal funding for CHIP and the Community Health Center Fund would never be designed to expire in the first place. But in the world we live in, Congress and the president should renew these programs in a timely manner. Competent and humane governance requires at least that much.

http://theweek.com/articles/728262/republican-incompetence-now-9-million-children-danger?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=afternoon&utm_medium=10_03_17-most_popular_4-728262

************


Reality - the GOP cannot trust you liberals to vote on a bill and not add more pork to it for your other special interests. That's the bottom line here.  

Go figure, when it comes to fucking poor kids, many from minority groups, ... the republicans (Christian evangelists, moderates, organized racists, private militias, Dixiecrats, all supported by Russian agents), no one can claim they didn't all pull together and get the job done.  

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