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SRIA Director arrested on drug charges

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http://ssrnews.com/sria-director-arrested-on-drug-charges/



The Director of Administration for the Santa Rosa Island Authority was arrested in Gulf Breeze Proper Wednesday evening after she and her husband were pulled over and marijuana extract was found on their persons along with pills.
Thirty-two-year-old Robbie Schrock, who works for SRIA and her husband, Adam, were both arrested and booked into Santa Rosa County Jail early Thursday morning.
Robbie was charged with Drugs Possession and Drug Equipment Possession and her husband was slapped with DUI, Drugs Possession and Drug Equipment Possession charges by the Gulf Breeze Police Department.
According to the Gulf Breeze Police arrest report, a Be On the Lookout (BOLO) was put out on at 7:25 p.m. on Wednesday after the police department received numerous calls regarding an individual driving erratically down U.S. Highway 98.
The vehicle was later pulled over at the 1200 block of Gulf Breeze Parkway after it was observed by an officer “drifting back and forth from the fog line to the center line on numerous occasions”, the report stated.
According to the arrest report, when the officer asked the driver, Adam, for his driver’s license and registration, the man handed the officer his license, an invoice for an automotive repair and an unknown card.
The officer noted that Adam seemed “lethargic” when he was searching his vehicle for the documentation. The officer also noted that a strong odor of alcohol was coming from the vehicle.
According to the report, Adam told the officer that he had consumed “a couple” of beers earlier that night.

Adam Schrock
An officer later conducted a field sobriety test on the man and he did not pass, the report indicated.
When the officer went to arrest Adam and pat him down, he found two halves of a pill in his pockets. The report indicated that the two pill halves were later identified as Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine. Dextroamphetamine is a central nervous system stimulant and amphetamine enantiomer that is prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Narcolepsy.
When the officer asked Robbie if her husband takes any medication, she told the officer he did not, the report stated.
According to the report, the officer noted that Robbie seemed too intoxicated to drive, so he offered to get her a ride.
When the officer asked Robbie to exit the vehicle, he noticed a clear plastic container lying on the passenger floorboard. The officer recognized the container as one that would contain an extremely potent form of marijuana extract known as butane hash oil. According to the report, the contents of the container were later tested and tested positive for marijuana, the report stated.
Robbie refused to talk to the officer and told the officer she would only talk to him with an attorney present, the report stated.
Upon further searching the vehicle, officers confiscated an electronic cigarette that had residue in it that appeared to be the butane hash oil that was inside of the container found by Robbie, the report stated.
Schrock came aboard for the SRIA in 2013 replacing former SRIA Director of Administration Russell D. Scarritt, who ironically was arrested in June 2013 for stealing thousands of dollars worth of items from a bouillon store.
SRIA would not comment on the arrest.

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She can say goodbye to her job!

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This is nearly the exact result even if drugs were legalized. They were negligent of public safety.

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PkrBum wrote:This is nearly the exact result even if drugs were legalized. They were negligent of public safety.
Exactly....I couldn't care less what they do at home; their behaviour put others in danger.

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If you can't do the time, don't commit the crime. From the author of the longest running thread in PNJ history. Just the facts. Laughing

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I am not sure that the passenger did anything wrong. Certainly, she could have been drunk without that being a crime, but officer would have no right to give her a breathalyzer. The clear plastic bag on the floorboard in open sight is going to be a topic in a suppression hearing. If her DNA is on any of the pipes, it still will be a problem at a suppression hearing if the defendant on the dui simply says that was my bag. I will have to reread the article. I am not sure what she did wrong to be charged with a crime. She made no admission, and the standard of constructive possession is going to be very difficult in this case, if the driver simply says that the plastic bag was his. I am sure there will be DNA testing, and she will remain silent until they actually have evidence, but any defense attorney is going to raise some legitimate questions about the search of the vehicle in a suppression hearing. This could be totally legitimate, but how easy could it be for a setup and destruction of a person's reputation by simply being a passenger with a spouse who rightfully should be the target of a criminal investigation. The loss of a job with this type of allegation prior to a hearing would really be ill advised.

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I didn't read they gave her a breathalyzer? The article said she was charged w/ having drugs on her person but that wasn't the case. Only the husband had it on his person.

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Floridatexan wrote:butane hash oil


Those crazy kids ....

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/butane-hash-oil

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We need better testing procedures for THC. Clearly, this driver was impaired, but if a blood test can pick up THC from a month ago in a blood screen, and that THC can be from a secondary source, our roads may become more dangerous with the legalization of pot. I am a proponent of the legalization of pot. I would not drive a vehicle if I had been smoking. However, unless there is a fair and accurate testing of the THC levels which correspond with impairment levels like BAC, we need to go slow on legalization. One of the reasons I have not done the Medical Pot is because in Illinois I may have a legal card, I may have not smoked for two weeks, but a current blood screen after an accident could show THC in my blood, and as my daughter has warned me this would result in a driving under the influence. If a horrible accident was involve through no fault of mine, and I was involved in that accident and found to be under the influence because of pot from a few weeks ago.......that is a risk I am not willing to take. I do not understand why the industry is not pushing for more accurate LEO tools to measure THC and impairment. This is the 400 lb gorilla in the room. The initial reports from Colorado, however have been very positive with reductions in alcohol sales, crime, and traffic accidents.

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2seaoat wrote:I am not sure that the passenger did anything wrong.  Certainly, she could have been drunk without that being a crime, but officer would have no right to give her a breathalyzer.  The clear plastic bag on the floorboard in open sight is going to be a topic in a suppression hearing.  If her DNA is on any of the pipes, it still will be a problem at a suppression hearing if the defendant on the dui simply says that was my bag.  I will have to reread the article.  I am not sure what she did wrong to be charged with a crime.  She made no admission, and the standard of constructive possession is going to be very difficult in this case, if the driver simply says that the plastic bag was his.  I am sure there will be DNA testing, and she will remain silent until they actually have evidence, but any defense attorney is going to raise some legitimate questions about the search of the vehicle in a suppression hearing.   This could be totally legitimate, but how easy could it be for a setup and destruction of a person's reputation by simply being a passenger with a spouse who rightfully should be the target of a criminal investigation.   The loss of a job with this type of allegation prior to a hearing would really be ill advised.


That's a fair clear eyed evaluation Mr. Oats!

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I would suggest they call Tommy Ratchford.

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Joanimaroni wrote:I would suggest they call Tommy Ratchford.



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2seaoat wrote:We need better testing procedures for THC.   Clearly, this driver was impaired, but if a blood test can pick up THC from a month ago in a blood screen, and that THC can be from a secondary source, our roads may become more dangerous with the legalization of pot.  I am a proponent of the legalization of pot.   I would not drive a vehicle if I had been smoking.   However, unless there is a fair and accurate testing of the THC levels which correspond with impairment levels like BAC, we need to go slow on legalization.   One of the reasons I have not done the Medical Pot is because in Illinois I may have a legal card,  I may have not smoked for two weeks, but a current blood screen after an accident could show THC in my blood, and as my daughter has warned me this would result in a driving under the influence.   If a horrible accident was involve through no fault of mine, and I was involved in that accident and found to be under the influence because of pot from a few weeks ago.......that is a risk I am not willing to take.  I do not understand why the industry is not pushing for more accurate LEO tools to measure THC and impairment.   This is the 400 lb gorilla in the room.   The initial reports from Colorado, however have been very positive with reductions in alcohol sales, crime, and traffic accidents.

Are you kidding me? This is what law enforcement has been focusing on since day one of Nixon...that is the downside, if you will, of marijuana...it stays in your system. This has been used for decades to seize the property of suspects, before they're convicted of any crime, and to deny jobs to people based on their habits. I think you're really afraid they will seize your assets.

There were other considerations here: the driver was drunk; there were other, unexplained drugs in the car besides the hash oil; etc. You're focusing on the trees.

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No just speaking from knowledge and experience. If you smoke pot in Illinois and are involved in an accident and they find THC in your blood, you can be charged with impaired driving. I believe that there must be a more accurate testing process for impairment, or all folks who use pot and who are not impaired are at risk.

Let me help you. The fact that I have THC in my blood cannot lead to a forfeiture under Illinois law. If however, I possess illegal drugs in a vehicle, and I commit a crime , a forfeiture is an additional part of the deterrent against illegal drugs. My daughter is doing all forfeitures in the civil division of the States Attorney's office and shares my concerns that these forfeitures often result in injustice. I am not concerned about anybody taking my assets because I transferred all my interest in all assets to my wife in January 2012 when the cancer went to my liver and I was convinced I would be dead in six months.

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