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Would someone please interpret a graph for me. I'm Jethro and I graderated the 2nd grade.

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This is the graph. This compares the average error in hurricane track forecasting by decade.

Now for the question. We're going to focus on the vertical 24 hr line on the graph.
The question is, are these two statements true?

1. That in the 1970's, the 24 hr margin in error of the forecasting was about 120-125 miles?

2. BUT, by the 2010's, that error has been reduced to about 50 miles?

True? Or false?

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Where is the graph in this thread Jethro. They teach you in the third grade to attach the graph and subject of your thread to the thread. I do not know if I will be here in a year waiting for you to learn that in third grade, and I sure as hell will put up the white flag waiting if you are going to third grade in the Escambia County school system.

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2seaoat wrote:Where is the graph in this thread Jethro.   They teach you in the third grade to attach the graph and subject of your thread to the thread.   I do not know if I will be here in a year waiting for you to learn that in third grade, and I sure as hell will put up the white flag waiting if you are going to third grade in the Escambia County school system.

Sorry. Here's the question again and this time WITH the graph. lol

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This is the graph. This compares the average error in hurricane track forecasting by decade.

Now for the question. We're going to focus on the vertical 24 hr line on the graph.
The question is, are these two statements true?

1. That in the 1970's, the 24 hr margin in error of the forecasting was about 120-125 miles?

2. BUT, by the 2010's, that error has been reduced to about 50 miles?

True? Or false?

View user profile
Yes the forecast accuracy has reduced inaccuracy by fifty miles in 46 years. You do realize that a cat 3 eye can be thirty miles in diameter and that in almost fifty years they have only improved their accuracy only 24 hours out to landfall by fifty miles, and at 72 hours it still is a joke. Rita was almost 200 miles in total breadth, so tell me Bob about your chart and the science.

1. Is the eye the point of reference on a prediction, and is it the center of the eye or any part of the same?

2. If the eye is almost 30 miles in diameter in a large cat 3, are they predicting landfall on the destructive wall portion of the Hurricane which pushes the surges?

This actually could be worse than throwing darts if they are not predicting the most destructive portion of a hurricane. Like you said.....big difference from Pensacola, Biloxi, and Mobile in Ivan.

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